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If guard dogs require obedience and trainability this guy (Chow) was a total fail, but I will say he had the most common sense of any dog I owned. Guarding the house and walking the perimeter came natural, I just couldn't get him to back down on command without physically removing him.


This is my Airedale Terrier I have now. Not really sure what she can do but at least she minds.


The most obedient dog I ever owned was a Lab mix. I really miss her.
 

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Guard dogs can be any breed, but obesely a larger dog is more menacing---also, I believe the guard dog attitude is born into the dog---the "real" guard dog can also "teach" another dog to respond to strangers by barking and growling at people it doesn't know or like.
We rescued an 6-8 month old little female Pit Bull my wife found on the street---sweet, loyal and smart---we tried to find her owners as the vet told us this was a $1000+ pure bred Pit---no luck. We kept her as our two existing dogs were getting old and slowing way down. Within 6 hours our new dog had taken over all guard dog duties---patrolling our large fenced-in yard and growing at strangers who approached our house---even me until she figured out who I was! Our other dogs made it quite clear they were now "retired" and our "Lucy" (so named by my wife as she was running loose)---she was born to guard---yet if I bring in an young child into the yard, she will play with and protect that child as part of our/her property... Amazing dog---we've had her for 7 years now and she just gets better!
 

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I didn't read more than just a few, so pardon me if I am redundant.
As many said, any dog is good at being a warning system. The next is if there is anything behind the bark. I have no tolerance for "toy" breeds, which is probably an unfair judgement, but is seems few small dog owners understand that all dogs need training. We have Rottweilers, and have for over 25 years, usually two. They are very alert to their surroundings, and people take them very seriously. The folks/ neighbors on either side and friends and family know that they are very gentle and friendly, unless they don't like you.
All big dogs require more commitment from their owners in training and responsibility. Very many big dog owners quickly find they are not up to the reality of owning big dogs...despite how cuddly they are small, or wonderful the well grown and trained adults appear to be. For myself, I cant imagine owning any other breed, and actively discourage folks form getting them for themselves. To follow up....
There is a very big learning curve with big dogs...much less with smaller dogs. A mutt from the kennel can be an awesome guard dog as an alarm system. You take it from there.
 

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I realize that the O.P. has probably had a couple dogs live out their lifespans since the thread was started......but I have had and known many dogs in my 63 years and I can't recall ever seeing one of any breed that didn't ferociously jump in to attempt to defend a pack member in even a roughhousing "threat". That being said, I wouldn't want a "teacup" anything as a guard. I will sometime in the not too distant future be moving to some acreage and from what I have found from research the dog that I will choose as companion, alert, protector is an Anatolian shepherd.
 

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In 2016, my Mastiff died of age.... I was without a "guard" dog for some time. I had (and still do) a Carolina Dog that is a solid alarm, and very aggressive... but at 50#, her ability to actually DO anything are limited by the laws of physics.
In late 18, at a patrol base deep behind the lines in Pineland, the subject of dogs came up, a coworker had just recieved a pair of Rottweiler pups... I'd had rots in the 90s, good, solid, loyal dogs... long story short, he put me in touch with his breeder, and late winer of 2019, I recieved an 4 week old pup- damn peer pressure and scotch...
I waa pushed back into the operator force and deployed a couple money later, and missed several formative months- I left a 2.5 month old pup and returned to a year old, 120# adolescent. The last couple months have been an interest reconditioning and bonding experience.
Fortunately, his caretaker did well with conditioning, fundamental training, and establishing both dominance and developing protective instincts. He's adjusted well to me as a new alpha, but still struggles when both the caretaker and I are present- divided loyalties. However, alone with me, there's no question. Visitor are greeted with suspicion, and then- with my approval- ignored. Without, suspicion turns rapid to hostile. Best of all- due entirely to the work of another- push button control. Regardless of what the dog wants or thinks, he obeys without hesitating....
I think there's a difference between an alert, watch, guard, and working dog.
 

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Is the Carolina Dog dominant over the new Rottweiler?

Following my example of retiring last year our 9 year old Rott has decided he is retired. We will be getting a new dog soon. We've had a string of Rotties but that doesn't guarantee the breed of our next dog.
 

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Lisl von Schlaf, West German & Czech line. Brothers working for Kansas Highway Patrol and Canadian Border Guard

Very well trained and my constant companion.







 

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Is the Carolina Dog dominant over the new Rottweiler?

Following my example of retiring last year our 9 year old Rott has decided he is retired. We will be getting a new dog soon. We've had a string of Rotties but that doesn't guarantee the breed of our next dog.
She is when necessary, but also pretty tolerant.... she stays outside (by choice) probably 90% of the time. The Rot and the hound mongrel spend more time inside, the latter only spends a couple hours a day outside and the Rot divides his time, makes some rounds outside, comes back in. The dog's can come and go from the house as they please.
The CD owns the yard, and controls the interactions with the otbers there.

I didn't realize how much I'd missed the Rotts....I'm curious as to how he'll finish out, he's almost 29". Much bigget than I was expecting, almost mastiff /molosser like in characteristics...
 

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So many watered down and poorly bred breeds that were once great. Dobes, back in the Magnum PI and prior days were great. Alot harder to find legit DObes without congenital health issues. just google dobes health issues. Within the Dobe, there are offsets - american european, which are the same but different.
Even more so Within the "German Shepherd", many variations and most what is bred in America is not the same dog it was 30 years ago.
Let's see the variations consist of:
Czech
West german working lines
West german show lines
American show lines
East German/DDR
"American backyard" lines

I have had 5 GSD's and all were working lines (mix between WG/DDR/CZECH), and 2 I imported from the Czech Republic.

Anyway, a well-bred, real GSD is hard to beat IMO. I could give a rat's ass about bite force. If the bite force wasnt there, they wouldnt have been used by the military and police for the last 70+ years.....
You've described, in the dogs you've had, the exact cause of genetic health issues and shorter longevity in purebreed dogs: LINES.... there's limited foundation stock, and individual breeders have access to even smaller pools of sample. In an effort to propagate desirable traits observed, in and line breeding is commonplace. The more the genetic pool is limited, the greater probability, over generations, of health issues developing.
Of note, kennel and breed clubs are a relaxing new concept, less than 150 years old in most cases, as is the idea of "breed standards". Current dogs are far remote from their origins....
 

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In post 109 I included a picture of our pup when he was just 12 weeks old. He has grown into a very loving, obedient, and loyal companion, but he's not much of a guard dog after all. He will let you know if someones there before you know it, but if push came to shove he would probably roll over for a belly rub. He is handsome though. And loves going for a ride in my truck.
 

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I stand by that comment. Frankly, it wasn't strong enough. I will restate it:

Almost no family dog not trained in protection will be equipped mentally and physically to take on, much less take down, a threat. Most family dogs lack any sort of useful training, and most people have no clue how to train a dog.

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Everybody thinks their dog loves them, their dog will protect them and their children. This is because the see their dogs as hairy people, not as what they are. Your experience, unless you have either been involved in robbing enough houses to test dogs, have worked with dogs on these issues or have taken a lot of police reports about hero dogs saving families, is really not the point. They are just anecdotes, either yours or ones you inherited from others.
After having an Akita share our life with my wife and kids for 11 years I would beg to differ on this point.
 

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I have a maltese. Hes 5lbs. He sure isn't guarding anything. However, this dog could probably hear a pin drop about 20 feet from the front or back door. And he sure has hell intends to let me know about it. He's like a little siren. No matter how quiet you think you can be, if you're even tip toeing through my front yard hes going to let me know about it well in advance. Downside is this causes many false alarms lol.
 
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