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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
In NC you must get permission from the church to carry during service. The law concerns a "place of worship". Many churches here hold hotdog sales during the week, usually in a meeting hall other than the sanctuary. Is an annex or meeting room considered a place of worship during a hotdog sale?
 

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Sounds like a question for a bona fide lawyer with his shingle up to date and hanging on the wall.

But in the long run, . . . if you have permission, . . . who cares where it is?

Personally, . . . I would not set foot in a church where the pastor and/or board was paranoid enough to declare it a gun free zone.

May God bless,
Dwight
 

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In NC you must get permission from the church to carry during service. The law concerns a "place of worship". Many churches here hold hotdog sales during the week, usually in a meeting hall other than the sanctuary. Is an annex or meeting room considered a place of worship during a hotdog sale?
No, I dont believe you do NC. I would be curious to find out where you read this. As long as it is not posted, you should be good to go. Dont get funeral procession confused with church carry.
 

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I guess it would depend on who you are asking. As far as the government is concerned any business conducted at that address is church business, especially if the church has a 501 (C) 3 status with the IRS. The entire property (the part with an address) is property tax exempt, not just the room that they use for worship. If a church is using the building for "money making" enterprises it has to be something that it can prove goes to church business otherwise there are limits and pretty strict rules. If a 501(C)3 they could lose that status. For example, a church cannot hold political rallies endorsing one candidate over another, a gray area would be to hold piano recital put on by a church member that makes her/his living by teaching a piano, suing the church building and the churches piano. My question would be if a church takes an official stance on concealed carry, do they expose themselves to liability if something tragic or violent should happen. After all, lawyers tend to go after the deepest pockets first. It may be churches that don't want to allow concealed carry are allowing insurance companies to govern their decisions. Understandable, even if not agreed to.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
chief1297_ I read that somewhere. It may have been in the CHP class material. You are right, I can find no state statute prohibiting carry in church unless it is posted the same as any other private property. Thanks for making me look up the statutes. Always a good refresher.
 

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In NC you must get permission from the church to carry during service. The law concerns a "place of worship". Many churches here hold hotdog sales during the week, usually in a meeting hall other than the sanctuary. Is an annex or meeting room considered a place of worship during a hotdog sale?

I quoted this so that I could be sure that I actually read what I think I read.
 

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I would certainly attain a higher state of worship in the typical places of worship if their were hot dogs for sale.
Further, I would probably want to find out whether or not I had that permission the law requires, and if the administrator of said place of worship did not grant it, I would be unlikely to consider said place of worship a worthwhile place to do my worshipping, regardless of hotdogs.
 

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It depends on your state. An email to your state attorney general would be the best -- and cheapest -- way to get the final word.

Fortunately in Kansas, "places of worship" are not off limits unless otherwise posted. Also, private property owners are not liable if a CCW holder uses a firearm, the guy with the gun shoulders the legal liability provided. Since July 1, 2013, private property owners are protected by, "liability immunity provisions relieving private building owners of any liability for the acts or omissions to act by a licensee with regards to a firearm. For the liability immunity to apply the building must either 1) have adequate security measures and be properly posted; or 2) allow licensees to carry in the buildings. If the building is closed to concealed carry without adequate security measures the immunity does not apply...."
Definitions from the bill: Adequate Security Measures: Personnel and electronic equipment at every public entrance of a building to detect and restrict the carrying of any weapons into the building. [HB2052 § 2, (l)(1) and HB2052 § 5(g)(1) and HB2052 § 9(g)(1)]"
 
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