1911Forum banner

1 - 20 of 28 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
42 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have a GCNM Series 80 that I’m doing a little upgrading on. I picked it up early this year and, other than putting on an expensive set of grips, I don’t think it had ever been fired let alone cleaned. The hammer actually hits the grip safety enough that it has left a mark to go with the one on the web of my hand:D but that’ll be the subject of another thread.

I actually like the feel of the trigger but thought it was just a little harder that it should be. I picked up a Wheeler gauge and it seems to be fairly predictably between 4 and 3/4 to 5 pounds. What would be reasonable for a factory Series 80 Colt?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,953 Posts
Consider your trigger pull golden.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
313 Posts
If you have XL Hands and have pulled wrenches when younger like I have 4-5 Lb is OK.
I tested my RIA A2 double stack I am building now and it is 3 1/2 Lb.
One thing I have noticed is that if the trigger pull is too high, I tend to move the 1911 when I dry fire with a snap cap.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,365 Posts
Weight is not the only consideration. Properly prepped sear nose, hammer hooks, disconnector, trigger bow, trigger track in the frame, sear spring, mainspring, and mainspring housing all contribute to the feel. A 4-1/2# pull can feel like 3# if the parts are good and everything is addressed correctly. The devil is in the details...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15,474 Posts
On a defensive pistol that will be used with high levels of adrenaline 4 to 5 Lbs. is perfect. If someone is about to kill you then you will not even notice the pull weight. If it is going to be strictly a range/target gun then you can go lighter. 5 lbs. pull weight is better than average for most factory Colts I have worked on. Thye're usually higher than that. I would pull the firing pin plunger out and look for nicks on it that would indicate the plunger is not fully clearing the firing pin and having to force it out of the way. That is pretty common on factory guns and worst case scenario you could end up with a gun that won't fire when you want it to.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,289 Posts
I try to hit 3-1/2 to 4 and very crisp.

After any years of Bullseye shooting a trip though
Gunsite sped me up for self defense shooting.

My accuracy elicited interesting responses from our instructors.
One shot on an 8 inch disk at 60 yards to hit it.
Standing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,569 Posts
I believe the minimum of a NRA National Match trigger was 3.5 lbs for the 45 pistol. My Series 70 NMGC is or was right at 4 lbs when I last checked it 25 or so years ago.

Around 1984-5, I recall a friend having bought a NMGC (80 series) after playing with mine everytime we had Monday Night Football at my apartment. Being an engineer, he figured if light triggers were good, lighter is better. He reduced the engagement and tweaked the sear spring until my scale read 2 1/2 lbs. We went to an IPSC meet later and his gun "inadvertently fired" a couple times, before he was quite ready. The R.O. stopped him, of course, and made him unload and show clear. End of the day for him.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,513 Posts
https://www.m1911.org//technic20.htm

I consider 4 to 4.5 lbs perfect for a carry trigger.
But a clean 5 lb is doable.
On my carry guns I usually just clean up the factory parts as per this link.

I have a fairly new Gold Cup and the trigger was way too heavy right from the factory for a gun set up for target use.
On that one I installed a Cylinder and Slide Super match 3.5lb. trigger kit and one of their series 80 pull reduction kits.
The kits are pretty much plug and play.

Always remember after any trigger work. Do the bench safety checks and then only load two rounds into the magazine until the gun proves itself.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
42 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Thank you gentlemen for your input. This is an EDC gun. Though not perfect, it feels like an extension of my hand. I want it to be good but utterly reliable too. I have some nitride coated series 80 parts from Cylinder and Slide that I’ll substitute in when I do other work such as the grip safety, but otherwise, I’ll consider myself lucky and focus my attention elsewhere.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,365 Posts
... This is an EDC gun... I want it to be good but utterly reliable too. I have some nitride coated series 80 parts from Cylinder and Slide that I’ll substitute in...
Do you have the older Elliason sight or the current BOMAR clone sight? What about the trigger, old steel with the kidney cut or the newer aluminum?

The Elliason is notorious for breaking the elevation pivot pin and the steel trigger makes it more difficult to get a decent light trigger pull as it is more prone to trigger bounce. Guns with that trigger also have the extra sear depressor and spring that are easy to lose. Were I you I would replace the steel trigger and get some extra pins to have on hand.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,309 Posts
This!

I try to hit 3-1/2 to 4 and very crisp.

After any years of Bullseye shooting a trip though
Gunsite sped me up for self defense shooting.

My accuracy elicited interesting responses from our instructors.
One shot on an 8 inch disk at 60 yards to hit it.
Standing.
This!

Below 3 pounds requires a lot of practice to master and avoid "bump fires" as mentioned in another post!

Smiles,
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,569 Posts
Do you have the older Elliason sight or the current BOMAR clone sight? What about the trigger, old steel with the kidney cut or the newer aluminum?

The Elliason is notorious for breaking the elevation pivot pin and the steel trigger makes it more difficult to get a decent light trigger pull as it is more prone to trigger bounce. Guns with that trigger also have the extra sear depressor and spring that are easy to lose. Were I you I would replace the steel trigger and get some extra pins to have on hand.
If the sight pin is replaced with a solid heat treated pin, it generally will go the distance. Mine has been in there for 40 years and thousands of rounds of ball and target loads.

The big wider steel trigger will work fine for anything around 4 lbs or more without bounce.

A good condition old NMGC is really a nice classic. Probably worth keeping it nice and find a more common gun for EDC, IMO.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
479 Posts
Hi,
I think from what I see, that there are a lot of EDC weapons out there with too light of a trigger.

There is a difference between trigger weight, and crispness or smoothnes of the break.

On my last Commander build I actually wanted about 5# of pull because after break in, I plan on carrying it, but did the prep work to make it a crisp 5#.

We are all "legends in our own mind" but in a stress situation, a light trigger on a combat piece is not good.

If you put in new parts remember that you can tweek the pull by setting the sear spring to get you what you want up to a point.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,430 Posts
4-4.5lbs for a carry-gun is ideal.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
10,852 Posts
A goods crisp trigger will feel lighter than it actually measures.
As for what is best... how many rounds have you fired and with what trigger? If you've got a lot of rounds downrange (10s of thousands, not 2 boxes) with a particular trigger, I'd try to make my carry gun similar.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,569 Posts
I don't EDC anymore, but when I did, the Detonics I carried, I set it up at just over 5 lbs and had to fit a real Colt safety to it, to fix the poorly fit OEM. With no grip safety and a bad thumb safety, it was an AD waiting to happen.

I like light triggers. I had one 1911 set up for 2 1/2 lbs with all C&S ignition parts and loved that trigger. Ultimately I had to bring it up to about 3 1/2 lbs since it was gun I was building for my wife. She did well with that trigger right out of the gate.

But I'm more comfortable with having our home defense guns in the area of 5 lbs.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
21,985 Posts
For an out-of-the-box, production 1911, that's a typical pull weight.

For any kind of precision, I prefer 3.25-3.5, which, unlike a lot of light trigger jobs, will last forever.

It's important, to me, when switching among different guns, that they are close to being alike, rather than any specific pull weight; all of my guns are between 3.25 and 4 pounds, regardless of their purpose as carry gun, competition gun, etc.
 
1 - 20 of 28 Posts
Top