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What exactly is slingshotting? I've done a search for it on the forum, but all the posts seem to assume you know what it is, then launch into a debate about its merits versus using the slide stop. From what I gather, people who shoot Glocks need to do it, people who shoot 1911s are split.

Hopefully I'm not betraying too much ignorance here, but I'm just stumped.
 

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What exactly is slingshotting? I've done a search for it on the forum, but all the posts seem to assume you know what it is, then launch into a debate about its merits versus using the slide stop. From what I gather, people who shoot Glocks need to do it, people who shoot 1911s are split. Hopefully I'm not betraying too much ignorance here, but I'm just stumped.
Any question is welcome here as we all are in the learning process one way or another.

BillD hit it.

When slingshotting I usually just cross the left hand over, grab the top back of the slide, pull my hand (with the slide) back and just let the slide go or ride my hand right off the back of the slide thus slingshotting it forward to chamber the round......and you should do this with a round or dummy round going into the chamber as it is not real good to slam a slide shut on an empty gun.

Some weapons with shok buffers in them will not slingshot with a darn.....like my Kimber's.

Be safe, shoot well. :rock:
 

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Slingshotting is when, reloading a mag from slide lock, you release the slide by pulling the slide rearward and then releasing it thus allowing it to strip a round from the mag and slam closed on its own. The advantage to this is 1) you get full compression of the recoil spring which allows the slide to close with alittle more force. This would allow the pistol to be more likely to chamber a round that might be alittle out of spec or if you chamber is dirty or on the tight side. 2) it requires less motor skill to grab the rear of the slide since its bigger, than the slide release button. Both of these advantages may help in a tactical situation where you are stressed, seconds count and your pistol may be covered in mud, dirt or blood.
 

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And, there's also the definition that "slingshotting" is when you, literally, pull the slide back, using the thumb and index finger, just as you would shoot a slingshot. I use the four-fingers-over-the-slide method, myself.
 

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And, there's also the definition that "slingshotting" is when you, literally, pull the slide back, using the thumb and index finger, just as you would shoot a slingshot. I use the four-fingers-over-the-slide method, myself.
WalterGC and mitrod3 make a good point. At least one trainer I know will get very upset if he sees someone on his line pulling the slide to the rear and releasing it in this manner (literally, like you pull back the elastic/pouch on a slingshot).

The reason he teaches the overhand racking method described by Walter GC and mitrod3 is that you're far less likely to slip and not get the slide pulled all the way to the rearward extent of its travel. A "short stroke" when retracting the slide to release it and chamber a fresh round when you need it (say, immediately after a slide lock reload) could be disastrous (might not pick up a fresh round, or the lesser spring force may not return the slide fully to battery).

The firm purchase that getting all four fingertips on the opposing side of the slide, with the heel of that same hand pushing from the near side of the slide, pretty much guarantees that your grip won't slip as you run the slide (hard!) to the rear and let it go. Pushing the gun forward with the firing hand at the same time increases the chance of a "full rack."

So in my world (as a function of training with this instructor), "slingshotting" is a bad word to describe a bad way to run the gun (pinching the back of the slide with thumb and forefinger). What we're really doing is "racking the slide" or "running the gun" using the entire support hand (four fingers and heel of the hand, at least).

Whatever we call it, it's done with a very positive grip and vigorous rearward motion, then letting go of the slide quickly and completely to let the recoil spring do its job and return the gun to battery with a fresh round in the chamber. Hanging onto the slide only retards its progress back into battery.
 

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2) it requires less motor skill to grab the rear of the slide since its bigger, than the slide release button. Both of these advantages may help in a tactical situation where you are stressed, seconds count and your pistol may be covered in mud, dirt or blood.
Let's not go there.
 

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It's also called slingshotting because you pull the slide all the way to the rear and let it go. You can induce a malfunction by "riding" the slide down, as the gun is designed to run at full speed.
 

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Since nobody has address this part of the question, glock people "need" to slingshot because glocks don't have much of a release to grab onto with your thumb so its just easier and faster to use the slingshot vs trying to find the tiny release. Being left handed just makes it even harder so I slingshot every pistol.
 
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