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I got started in cowboy action shooting and found out that I needed a lot of ammunition to play. I told my wife that it would become real expensive for me to continue cowboy action shooting unless I started reloading--- at least that's what I told her. The real reason is that I just couldn't stop once I got interested in reloading I wanted to do more and more and more so what's your reason, why did you start reloading???
 

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Initial reason why I started reloading.....

I started shooting a lot of volume, so reloading allowed my to shoot more with less cost. I began shooting NRA outdoor "Bullseye" shooting.

I haven't purchased a factory round of ammo for my guns and rifles in many, many years.

I still shoot competitively, but now it is action pistol shooting games. At one point in my action shooting days, I was shooting about 20-25K rounds per year of hot .38 super ammo. After two consecutive years of doing this, I developed "tennis elbow" in both arms from the impact of the major power factor loads I used, and had to quit shooting for almost a year to allow my arms to heal.

Since Factory .38 super is very expensive, I could never have justified the cost of using factory ammo, when making my own reloads was about 1/3 the cost.

I now reload for over all economy, the ability to shoot when ammo is scarce, and to fine tune my loads for each gun for the intended purpose. I have developed different loads for each gun, for optimal accuracy and performance. I have different loads in various calibers for competition and for self defense. Generally, my self defense loads are +P or +P+ with good quality JHP bullets.
 

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Cause I need mass quantities of ammo and I can't afford to buy it brand new.

If I could afford new ammo, I'd be selling the Dillons and buying ammo by the pallet load.

Shooting is my hobby. Reloading is something I have to do to feed my hobby.
 

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When I was 13 I sold a cow that I had raised from a bottle fed calf. My Dad bought me a 357 with the money. It didn't take long before I realized ammunition was going to cost more than my supply of animals to sell and reloading would allow me to shoot more on the same amount of money.
 

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I wanted a new hobby..!!!

Built, used, and fixed computers ever since the Timex Sinclair 2k computer and the first Commodore 64 with it's 40 column TV display..!! (Yuk)
Got tired of computers, sold it all and bought Handloading/Reloading "stuff"....

Now I love taking old IDE hard drives out and shooting them with 357's as targets..!! :dope:

It's all good.

Don2
 

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Bought my first gun
Bought my second gun
Wife bought her first gun
Wife bought her second gun.

Found I could buy bulk ammo on-line.
Realized WE were shooting up factory ammo faster than I could pay off the credit card.
Started reloading to be able to afford to shoot. Became quite "frugal" and before the lead/primer prices went through the roof was loading 50 rds of 230gr lrn for $2.13 vs. $8.50 for S&B 230fmj. For a time, we were shooting in excess of 5K per month.
Then found 250rnfp/255lswc/300fpl bullets and realized you couldn't buy factory loads in the big bullets (I know Buffalo Bore loads the 255's now, but not then).


Been reloading ever since.
 

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Save money and have ammo whenever I needed it. You can save money from an actual dollar standpoint if the amount of shooting you do does not increase or doesn't increase past the "threshold". I know that most end up shooting more because the per round cost comes down. Then they may not actually save dollars but they shoot more for the same cost so they are saving money, relatively speaking.

I don't shoot nearly as much as a lot of the folks here and it really didn't increase much after I started reloading. So, I am probably in the minority since it is actually saving me money (once I got past the break-even from initial equipment and component costs). I would venture to say that, with the cost of factory ammo due to SH and the related panic, I saved a significant amount over the past year ... fortunately I had plenty of components in my stock. I also learned just how few people reload in my area (and/or how few could afford factory ammo). The indoor range that I frequent most was all but empty up until fairly recently. In fact, it's still slow.
 

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Bought an M! Garand from the CMP, liked shooting it, but saw the writing on the wall as compatible 30-06 surplus ammo is starting to dry up. Got a Lee single stage kit, components, H4895, and now don't worry about it.

Icing on the cake when a friend gave me a Dillon 550 and I bought a Kimber that likes to be feed a steady diet of 45acp.
 

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I was in my early twenties, spending +60% of my yearly income on my motorcycles and the local tire changing outlet want to get rid of their wheels weights. Solder was cheap then.

I had a simple C-press, common dies, a basic casting pot and an old pie pan full of 50/50 wax and Vaseline. I had a swager die and tapped hand-lubed cast bullets by hand through this die with a small plastic hammer for sizing.

I reloaded and shot nothing but handloads made in this fashion for more than fifteen years. If I got a box of free commercial cartridges in a trade or when buying a new handgun, I used them for trade bait to get more components.

(I still have the manual sizing swager and the little plastic hammer.)
 

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Decided to reload as a backup. If the politicians start banning ammo or components I've got a pretty good stash. Or, the hoarders keep factory low or non existent, I'm all set.
 

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I began back in 1957 as a means to fine tune some match ammo. Been doing it ever since for my hunting ammo. Quit competition shooting in the mid 80's to focus on my X wifes efforts as a USA International team member. To that point we were shooting about 10K rounds per a month of just the 45acp. Simply could not afford factory ammo at that level! None of the factory ammo shot as well in our guns as the reloads. As for hunting loads, nothing compares to the accuracy of reloads made specifically for a particular rifle.
Now my daughter is actively reloading for pistol and rifle. Not as much but still we don't have to rely on stores having ammo in stock. With current state of affairs, she is stockpiling components, just in case. Back to the old standby of RCBS RockChucker with an older C-H MKIV for the 45acp. Ample for her needs.
 

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I like shooting and was getting angry with factory target ammo.

My last box of WWB 45s were ejecting all over the place with poor groups, in a well mannered gun that can usually put a hat on the ground and catch empties with good ammo. Mag of gold dots showed it was ammo not extractor.

Got a box of fed American eagle 158 lrn 38 spl that flatten primers in my j frame. O.O

My handloads have been taking 3 hours per 50 but have show themselves to be crazy accurate and cheaper than target grade ammo as of late.
 

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I started reloading while still in college, to shoot more on the same or less cost. As most people can testify, you don't save much overall, mainly because you shoot more. On a more rational basis, I can summarize as follows:

1: Shoot more at lower incremental cost.

2: Tailor loads for performance, such as accuracy, terminal ballistics or recoil control (not guilty of that yet).

3: Better consistency, especially when you can't always get the same products from dealers.

4: Reloading is carthartic. It is a change of routine and demands attention to detail.

#4 should be higher on the scale, when I'm of an age with more money than time (and not a lot of money). Considering the extended period of shortages, I've also grown to prefer more leisurely shooting, and weapons which make it easier to recycle brass. Hence, I mostly shoot revolvers and bolt or lever action rifles, limiting pistols mainly for self-imposed "re-qualification" for carry.
 

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I like doing things for myself. I bought a portable sawmill to make my own 2x4's, tanned my deer hide myself, grow my own vegetables, etc.. Reloading ammo was just an extension of this as has casting my own bullets which I have started to do. Next up will be to try and make my own gunpowder (black of course) but I'm not really expecting that to work very well still I'm going to try it.
 

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I like shooting and was getting angry with factory target ammo.

My last box of WWB 45s were ejecting all over the place with poor groups, in a well mannered gun that can usually put a hat on the ground and catch empties with good ammo. Mag of gold dots showed it was ammo not extractor.

Got a box of fed American eagle 158 lrn 38 spl that flatten primers in my j frame. O.O

My handloads have been taking 3 hours per 50 but have show themselves to be crazy accurate and cheaper than target grade ammo as of late.
3 hours per 50? :biglaugh: I'm so sorry...:D
 

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Cause I need mass quantities of ammo and I can't afford to buy it brand new.

If I could afford new ammo, I'd be selling the Dillons and buying ammo by the pallet load.

Shooting is my hobby. Reloading is something I have to do to feed my hobby.
Reloading has become a good hobby......;)

I have a short monotonous video that's 2 minutes and 30 seconds of my 1050 in action.....at 24 rounds per minute (a slow pace!)

I don't get much for "issued ammo" anymore but I like my loads just as much if not better....
 

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1988 I bought a Thompson Contender in 7mm TCU... as soon as I bought it I realized that ammo was only available if I made my own.

.223 rifle brass necked out to 7mm.. load a 154gr projectile..

and this was when internet didn't exist.. had to learn from scratch...
 

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Couldn't afford factory ammo costs back then, and its even worse today. I also discovered that I enjoyed it, and my ammo is better than anything I can buy.
 
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