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Discussion Starter #1
You buy a Wilson Combat spring kit, or even a Wolff kit(same), the kit will come with an 18.5lb and a 10lb recoil spring..... what load would you use a 10lb for? The softest load I've done is 200gr SWC over 4.0gr bullseye and it works with either a 14lb or 16lb recoil spring setup. How low can you safely go in 45ACP?
 

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What type of spring kit did you get?

The 10# spring may be for use in a compensated barrel / competition setup. I used a light 12# spring with my compensated Gold Cup. I used to shoot some light loads with 4.8 gr Win231 on a lead 200gr LSWC.

The idea is that the gases from the muzzle runs up the compensator ports to reduce the muzzle flip and the lighter spring has enough force to put the round into battery.

Now there are some variable wieght springs that ensures proper unlocking and ejection without slamming the frame back and locking into battery that is better than such a very light spring.
 

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Well... 3.8gr Clays with a Berry's 185gr HBRN doesn't run in my gun with a 12.5# variable. You're welcome to send me your 10# if you don't want it, it'll save me $8 or having to pull 200rds :D
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Lycanthrope said:
I run an 11lb spring with my Major IPSC loads.

200 LSWC at 880 fps. Just don't forget the shock buffs!
I'll try that 10# with my loads then, I use CP buffs so we're good to go.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Oh, one more question, I've got alot of Bullseye and RedDot powder and both I think have minimum charges of 'I think' 3.5 grains for a 200gr SWC, I'll have to double check. Do I risk anything by loading to the bare minimum charge? I'm not to nervous about using RedDot but Bullseye leaves so much air space will that create problems?
 

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The manuals are usually conservative, but, AS ALWAYS, work your way down slowly. By going light on loads you risk inconsistent burn rates and speeds as well as the risk of the bullets not stabilizing (and tumbling in flight).

I prefer Clays for my powder puff loads.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Tried it tonight, 10lb spring and shot 200grSWC over 4.0gr of Bullseye. Gun cycled great, I like it :) . I took 3 1911s and the other 2 had stock 16lb arrangements. The 10lb felt good, very flat compared to the stock sprung ones.
 

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JeffC,

Glad you like the recipe. I found that the larger shok buffs change the recoil stroke even more. If you like THAT then try 185gr bullets or even 155 frangibles. 155's under 4.8 of Clays is very close to Major and sooooo smooth. MUCH better than 200's.

But I shoot those because of pricing.
 

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I've shot many 200 LSWC over 3.5 Bullseye.

I crimp them tight, but no problems. (.468)

Use a #13 in RRA NM Hardball. (With a Shock-buff.)
 

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I run a 10# spring in everything from 230 factory ball down. This was done rather reluctantly at first on the advice from my pistol smith. After throughly testing it out I am most pleased.

The smith also advised me AGAINST using shock buffers. He says the metal to metal contact is ok . Furthermore he says the shock buffers destructively affect the harmonic wave (or something technical sounding) through the metal of the pistol. He has see 3 frames crack while using shockbuffs with loads that shouldn't have damaged the gun. I have stayed away from buffers in the past based on the possibility that fragments from a damaged buffer could interfere with the normal operation of the gun. Also, all four of my 1911's seem to suffer in the relable ejection department when I use them.

This guy has been an armorer/gunsmith for nearly 30yrs. He works on my guns so not only does the local PD trust him with their lives....I guess I do too.
 

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He has see 3 frames crack while using shockbuffs with loads that shouldn't have damaged the gun.
That's not enough information to come to that conclusion. That's the level of research gun grabbers use to show guns are dangerous to society.

Frame cracks.
Gun has shock buffer.
Shock buffers cause frame cracks.

Bad science man.

It may be that the cracks occured because the recoil springs weren't shortened to accomodate the loss of stroke length due to the thickness of the shock buffer. If the spring's too long, once it's fully compressed, it effectively becomes solid and that will beat up your frame. Some recoil springs are too long without the shock buffer. ISMI springs, I think, have instructions in the pack for trimming to the correct length.
 

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You're right. It's little better than anecdotal evidence. But it would be hard for one person to collect a scientifically significant level of information on this matter.

I'll take my chances with a 20 some-odd year vetran out of a major metropolitan PD armory. 30 plus years of gunsmithing is more than I'll ever have.


I'm willing to agree to disagree.
 

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I've seen shock buffs stop a gun (effectively....FTFs), because the the buff flattens and impairs the slide's ability to travel freely. But, other than that, I'm of the opinion that a shock buff is de rigueur when operating a 1911 with a low weight recoil spring. A 10#'er with 165+ power factor loads is a candidate for a buff in my book. YMMV
 

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Oh...I think the hundreds of competitors in IDPA and USPSA who run buffs and shoot 10,000+ rounds a year are a pretty good sampling base as to what Shok Buffs can and cannot do (mine had 6000+ this year). We do, however, know that running hot loads with a light spring WILL batter a frame.


The most comprehensive information I've found is on the Brian Enos forum. When you spend $2000+ for a competition gun, you want to know how to take care of it.

www.brianenos.com
 
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