1911Forum banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,197 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just got my bushing reamer and the new oversize bushing from brownells, and now I have a question. Should I cut the new bushing to the exact outside dia. of the bar. or should I go just a little larger,to avoid springing and if so how much?
Thanks again for all the help.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,137 Posts
Here's my way,but remember I'm not a smith.I like .001-.002 clearence between the bushing and barrel.The real trick is the linkup cuts.Most of the fitting is on the front lower and rear upper of the fitting band in the front of the bushing,but if the bushing is thick enough,the very top rear inside of the bushing will need clearencing.As long as the barrel is springing and there is marker or Dykem on the surfaces,you'll know where to relieve.The ideal fit is when you have no more springing,but you have solid barrel to bushing contact.Now,if the bushing isn't a tight fit in the slide,you have to remember the recoil spring plug is pushing foward on the bottom of the bushing.This rotates the bushing back into a springing state.I fit these to a point where you can just see the most miniscule bushing movement against the recoil spring plug.After an initial polishing and a break in,it'll be just right.

I don't care for the supertight fit on the barrel,some dirt will cause probs.A few thousandths will give some clearance for dirt and still provide consistant barrel positioning for repeatable extraction and ejection.Good luck and have fun.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,137 Posts
Well,you have to do both really.When you ream the bushing ID to the barrel,your creating the clearance for the bushing to slide over the barrel-BUT,this is the condition when the barrel is linked down.When the barrel links up,it will bind or 'spring'.The relief cuts allow the barrel to twist into lockup.In the front of the bushing will be the ring that gets reamed (the rear section has a larger ID).After reaming,the lower front and rear top of the ring is what gets relieved to allow the barrel to pivot as it locks up with the slide in the rear.Sometimes you will need to clearence the very rear top inside of the bushing on thicker barrels,but I don't let this area touch the barrel-only the fitting ring.If you can find a copy of Kuhnhausen's book,he describes the process in depth with pictures.I haven't had any luck posting pictures,sorry.You could of course ream until the springing goes away,but this leaves a very sloppy fit when the barrel is going through the extract,eject and feed mode.

Improving accuracy is the reason to fit a new bushing,but done this way it also helps stabilize the barrel for a more consistant extr,eject,etc.Hope this clears it up some.Holler back if not.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,137 Posts
A broach is great,but I don't have one.I usually start out with a needle file that is oval shaped kind of.A round will work,but there is less cutting area.A normal untapered file doesn't work too well on the rear of the ring without hitting other areas.I don't file though,I use a side to side scraping with constant testing and marker or Dykem to see my contact points.I don't recomend this next part to anyone not completely experienced with a Dremel and you must have a steady hand!When I get to the point the springing is a scrape or 2 from being gone,I put a superfine polishing rod in and polish the last little bit out.As long as the bushing fits the slide tightly,this whole process isn't bad.The prob with a loose bushing is the recoil spring pushes on the bottom of the bushing,causing it to rock back and put springing pressure back on the barrel.I don't know if a 16lb spring will impart enough pressure to matter,but it bugs me and I have to remove it.What a pain this part is to do.

Anyway,as long as you go slow and check alot,you'll have a great fit that will lock up tight.If you don't want to spend all the money at once on both books,get vol.1 first.Vol.2 is a little rehashing,but most of it is blueprints and match stuff.Vol.1 touches on match stuff like trigger work,but you have to read carefully on some things to distinguish between original spec and match specs.Barrel lockup is another area that both are discussed,but can be confusing if you just blow through it.Good luck and keep us informed.
 

·
Super Moderator
EDC: SIG P938.
Joined
·
22,331 Posts
For the kitchen table gunsmith, a group to which I am proud to belong, the EGW angle-bored bushing is an excellent alternative to fitting the bushing to the barrel. The bushing is drilled at the proper locking angle (rather than the unlocked "angle"), so all you have to do is fit the bushing ID to barrel OD. The "pre-fit" model has been a virtual drop-in for a Delta Elite and a Schuemann barrel in a Colt M1911A1.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,137 Posts
Harley,glad you understood my attempt at a description without pics,but even moreso that everything turned out great.I heard of the bushing Rick spoke of,but haven't used one.Don't really see a benefit either though(IMHO).It seems to me reversing the bushing will leave you with less of a hardfit on lockup.Don't know cause I haven't tried one,but I can be old fashioned at times(even considering my age).Happy to hear it wasn't a prob and the results were great(I think,you didn't mention if accuracy improved).As for the soldering,you're on your own here buddy.I'm terrified of bringing heat near my piece.I can mig weld like anyone or better,but hand me a flame and I'll put new meaning to warpage.Untill next time,shoot straight,safe and hard.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top