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Discussion Starter #1
I just bought a gun brush set for me first pistol(Para P16 blue).

It comes with a stainless steel, a Phosphor bronze and a nylon brush.

I was told the phosphor bronze one is to be use for general cleaning.

But I'm not sure what the other 2 are for?

Do I know to use all 3 for a field strip cleaning?
 

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I would toss the stainless brush, I think that their use harms bores of firearms. I know a goodly number of bench rest shooters that would never use a stainless bore brush. FWIW.

Even if you use copper "solvents" to clean your pistol, the bronze brush can be used to scrub the bore. The nylon brush will work well as a initial scrubber.

YMMV VWP NVIAS NWEI CCBS LS/MFT

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Right Jim, but remember that copper solvents also eat most bronze brushes. I think that's why a steel brush was included. You're right about tossing the steel brush - too agressive. Better to soak the barrel longer with copper solvent, and use a lot more passes with the nylon brush (or patches) to get out the copper fouling.

Of course, the bronze brush will work just fine with lead solvent, should you shoot that type of bullet.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
So is there another type of brush that's more suitable for cleaning? A brass brush??
 

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Originally posted by n2299:
So is there another type of brush that's more suitable for cleaning? A brass brush??

As far as copper solvents go, they have an appetite for both brass or bronze - so it really makes no difference. You can use this type of brush with copper bore cleaners, but you will need to replace the brushes frequently. This is why a stainless brush is sometime used with copper cleaners - although as mentioned, they are harsh and I wouldn't recommend them. Use a nylon brush and lots of patches.




[This message has been edited by shane45-1911 (edited 07-17-2001).]
 

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I know that copper solvents will attack bronze or copper brushes but since brushes wear out any way and you should have a good supply of them, why worry about that? Several dealers sell bore brushes in "bulk" at a better rate than buying them one at a time.



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If you want to get a bit more life out of your bronze brushes while using copper remover, try rinsing them off with bore scrubber or alchohol. It cuts down on the corrosion
 

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ditto what dnancarr said. Also, brake cleaner works good to clean dirty brushes. Spray off the brush in a glass jar and you can reuse it.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Originally posted by Ledbetter:
ditto what dnancarr said. Also, brake cleaner works good to clean dirty brushes. Spray off the brush in a glass jar and you can reuse it.
What kind of brake cleaner? A car's?
 

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Autoparts store inexpensive brake cleaner, the same stuff sold as gun cleaners.


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The nylon brushes are nice for general cleaning in other parts of the gun than the bore. I wrap a patch around them, and take advantage of the stiffness of the brush to force the fabric of the patch into those little places that are otherwise easily unreachable.

Nylon brushes started out in life (as far as I know) as case neck lube brushes. The "bottle" rifle cases are conventionally resized their full length. Then, the case neck is expanded to accomodate the bullet. The nylon brushes were introduced to place a small amount of case lube inside the case neck to ease the neck expanding process.

I later found another use for nylon brushes: black powder guns. The nylon brush is great for helping to remove the powder residue from the bore without scratching it. After all, you don't want the bore to tear the patch on a patched-ball gun.

Later, I found I could use the nylon brush for other parts of the BP gun like I do with my modern guns. Some of the BP guns are not made with the same kind of steel that modern guns have, so they are more easily scratched. The nylon brush helps avoid that.
 

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I use patches with the copper solvent as far as it will clean. Then, I dry patch out the copper solvent and brush with a patch saturated with CLP. That doesn't attack the bronze brush like Hoppes or other solvents, and 90% of the fouling is already gone. The CLP/brush job loosens the rest, which is typically at the base of each rifling where the patch couldn't reach. My brushes last longer as they aren't attacked by the solvent and they don't have as many passes down the bore as they would if I used them from the beginning.

I use nylon to scrub in finished areas, breechfaces, etc - typically with solvent.

With all of that said, brushes are so cheap that I'm not sure it matters much - just over a buck a piece if you order from Midway or whoever.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Originally posted by JiminCA:
I use patches with the copper solvent as far as it will clean. Then, I dry patch out the copper solvent and brush with a patch saturated with CLP. That doesn't attack the bronze brush like Hoppes or other solvents....
Jim,

What's CLP?
 

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I'm the other Jim, but I'll answer.
CLP = Cleaner, Lubricant, Preservative. Break Free is a CLP. Tri-Flo is another.

I was corrected on Preservative.
I should have read the bottle...

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[This message has been edited by Jim V (edited 07-19-2001).]
 

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Don't toss the stainless brush. They are very useful for cleaning the powder residue and heat discoloration from the cylinder face of stainless revolvers and have not left any marks on either my anaconda or king cobra. They also do an excellent job of removing the fine scuffs and scratches on the slides and frames of stainless 1911's, just brush with the grain and you will be amazed at the results. Keep it off the matte areas though. Don't use on Ultimate Bright Stainless. Just my experiences!
 
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