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Discussion Starter #1
I've been using the Tom Wilson jigs for 20 years or more. I got the Ron Power universal jigs for use on other guns when they came out. I've since bought the 1911 adapter for the Power jig. I have ended up using the Power jig to set the hammer hook height & the Wilson jig for the sear. I use the Wilson hammer jig to stone the engagement face of the hooks. I've seen the Marvel jigs, but don't want to spend the money unless they are substantially better than my current setup. Any thoughts on this from the smiths?
 

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Hi BBBBill,
I've used the Marvel jig & liked it okay, but it is made of anodized aluminum & it wore through pretty quick (maybe I was too rough with it??). Brownells stood behind it & replaced it with a Power Series 1 fixture which I thought would be more durable. The other complaint with the Marvel, is that I found the sear angle hard to set & change. The sear is held in place by a threaded shaft, using an interface with the hammer to establish the angle. Changing the angle is a hard thing to do, as there is not a set screw that locates the angle of the sear (like a Wilson jig).

The Powers Series I is a nice versatile tool, but I got one that was made "out of square" (it cuts the surface more on one side than the other). I'm still waiting on the arrival of it's replacement from Brownells. No one else (that I know of) has ever had this problem with the Power fixture. I sent the fixture first back to Ron Power (over a year ago) & they "replaced" it. Anyhow, the "second" fixture cut them just as crooked as the first (about .005" across the width of a 1911 sear). It sat on my shelf for a year, with me feeling bad about it, until I got in touch with Randy Bimson at Brownells tech department. Randy & Brownells are really stand-up guys and deserve our business. They are replacing the fixture.

I've also got the Power Series II fixture for stoning hammer hooks. It works good, but requires a special stone (trapezoidal shape) that is only available in "fine india" grade. I like a brighter finish on my hooks, but finer stones are not to be found, in my experience. The Marvel jig is really good for hammer hooks. You get excellent adjustability of angle & depth, as well as working with 1/2" X 6" stones.

The most useful sear jig on the market (IMO) is available from Brownells and is called "Brownells / Yavapai 1911 sear tool". It works great! It is very easy to change the primary angle setting. It also has a 25X magnifier that sits above a set of test engagement pins, allowing you to get a really good look at your engagement. It even cuts a sear square
. It is a little slower than the Powers Series I to change from the setting to cut the primary angle to the secondary angle, but all things considered, it is the best single purpose jig on the market.
Yes, I still use my Wilson sear & hammer jigs too! They are what kept me going while I was fooling around with the afore mentioned products. The Wilson hammer jig has been customized with the addition of a "fence" mace of tool steel that takes away the need for quite a much "touch" in keeping the hooks straight from side to side.
Sorry this got so long, I think you might have touched one of my "hot" buttons

Regards,
John Harrison
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Hi John. Thanks for the reply. The aluminum construction is one of the reasons that I didn't try the Marvel jig. I still like the Wilson, but I do have a small gripe with the hammer jig. The set screws for adjusting the height of the hooks don't hold well. I fixed that, but it is still a 3 hand tool & I've only got 2.
After the jig is adjusted, you have to hold the axle in place while you stone while holding the hammer at the same time. Needs a way to clamp/hold the axle to free up a hand. I'd like to see your mod. Post a pic if you can/don't mind. I,ve got both Power jigs also & haven't had a problem with them as you have. The instructions could have been better written, but they have worked well for all the guns I've used them on. I've looked hard at the Yavapai tool & it makes me itchy to spend money every time I see it.
 

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I'll send a pic soon as my good camera comes back from Miami. The "fence" that I made helps some with the three handed issue as now I can use one to hold the hammer in place and the other to move the stone. I didn't make the fence so that it has any way to be square to the axle pin, it just clamps to the surface with a C-clamp. I agree about the instructions with the Power jigs. I hope that I am soon to be happy with both jigs!
Treat yourself to one of those "unpronouncable" sear tools, you'll really like it if you do a lot of 1911 work.
How do you post pics to this site?
Regards,
John
 

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I was just wondering the same thing.

If I was going to do a trigger job or install a new trigger group, what do I need and what would be the best jig to get/use?

Anybody else have a favorite?
 

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Originally posted by Precision Gunworks:
How do you post pics to this site?
Regards,
John
Precision Man,
Check your email, incoming "Instruction".
RT



------------------
Talon Tactical
Southeast Asia District Sales Manager
 

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Originally posted by RG0:

If I was going to do a trigger job or install a new trigger group, what do I need and what would be the best jig to get/use?

Anybody else have a favorite?[/B]
I would reccomend Brownells P/N 080-785-000 trigger, hammer & sear kit. The cost is 225.95 and it gives you all of the specialty tools to get going. See page 81 of catalog 53. This kit has the Marvel jig that I didn't rate the best on the market, but understand that for a hobbiest, it will let you do a presentable trigger job. When I'm shopping for tooling, I'm looking for tooling that will do the job many hundred times (with adequate care). When I had my problem with the Marvel tool, Brownells tech guy told me that he had several at John Nowlin's shop that had held up very well. Mine may have had thin anodizing. If you're new to 1911 trigger jobs I would sure advise reading everything that I could get my hands on first and then proceed vewy vewy carefuwwy
Good Luck,
John
 

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John,

Thanks for the recommendation. I'll check the Brownells catalog when it comes in about a week.

You mentioned that the Marvel jig is good, but not the best in your opinion. Probably more than adequate for anything I would consider doing (very carefully of course).

Just wondering, what do you feel is the best? Would it be the Yapavai you mentioned above? You said it was the most "useful".

Thanks
 

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RGO,
Of the jigs & fixtures sold by Brownells, the Marvel is the only single tool that will do both sears & hammers on 1911's. All of the rest are for one part or the other.
For my shop, I use the Power Series I to cut both sear angles and the Yavapai tool to inspect the engagement and to test for uniform contact. I use the Power Series II to adjust the angle on rough hammer hooks and the Wilson hammer jig for final "polish" stoning.
My reason for saying the Yavapai is the most useful is because it can be used to stone a sear as well as used to see the engagement at 25 power. It will not do anything for stoning the hammer hooks and it is slower than the Power Series I for changing from promary to secondary sear angle.
There a Jillion different ways to do this work & everyone will find a method that works best for them. I've never cut hammer hooks on a mill before (I'd sure love to learn) but I'm sure it is a method that serves Don quite well (he has a reputation for doing quality work).
That's my story, and I'm stickin' to it

John
 

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Discussion Starter #13
This thread is informative. I started out with just the Wilson tools & began to look for something better. Ended up like John useing Wilson & Power jigs to get the best features of each. Sooner or later someone will build a great jig(s) to do it all. Of course we haven't heard from Dane, John Lawson, or some of the other smiths yet...hint.
 

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Originally posted by Precision Gunworks:
I've used the Marvel jig & liked it okay, but it is made of anodized aluminum.... The other complaint with the Marvel, is that I found the sear angle hard to set & change. The sear is held in place by a threaded shaft, using an interface with the hammer to establish the angle. Changing the angle is a hard thing to do, as there is not a set screw that locates the angle of the sear (like a Wilson jig).
Just a thought: I didn't like not being able to adjust the sear easily, too, so I lopped off the corner of the jig above the sear "channel", and installed an adjusting screw. Makes life oh, so much mo' better. Jig wears a bit, yes, but with square stones, should wear evenly, if that makes a difference......

Rich
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Just curious why Marvel didn't build that thing out of a good long wearing tool steel. Odd....
Would have been so much better.
 
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