1911Forum banner
1 - 20 of 66 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I fire a full magazine and the slide locks open as it should. When I insert another magazine, should I push the slide release and let it slam forward or should I pull the slide back a bit and let go of it to chamber the first round of the magazine? Which is less stressful to the components? I am shooting a Kimber Stainless II by the way. Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
79 Posts
damax452 said:
So I fire a full magazine and the slide locks open as it should. When I insert another magazine, should I push the slide release and let it slam forward or should I pull the slide back a bit and let go of it to chamber the first round of the magazine? Which is less stressful to the components? I am shooting a Kimber Stainless II by the way. Thanks.
Makes no difference, IMHO - the slide is traveling the same distance, under the same spring tension.

Matt
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
598 Posts
The only problem with using the slide release ( it's called a "slide release" nevertheless), is that over time the notche in the slide will begin to wear.

I use both methods. I use the slide release when I'm doing one handed drills, and in competition when I need to go faster. Otherwise at the range I use the slingshot method.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
7,483 Posts
There is no slide release on a M1911 pistol. It's a slide stop. :cool:

No harm to the pistol using it as a release, but it's a unique fine motor skill motion used only for this operation. Reaching over the slide and push-pulling your two hands briskly will release the slide, charge the chamber from an empty condition regardless of slide position, clear stoppages, etc. Same motion works on the M1911, Glocks, SIGs, HKs, Berettas, you name it. You don't have to fumble for that funny position SIG slide stop if you just reach over every time. Or that PPK slide stop! :p

-- Chuck
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,759 Posts
Chuck S said:
There is no slide release on a M1911 pistol. It's a slide stop. :cool:

No harm to the pistol using it as a release, but it's a unique fine motor skill motion used only for this operation. Reaching over the slide and push-pulling your two hands briskly will release the slide, charge the chamber from an empty condition regardless of slide position, clear stoppages, etc. Same motion works on the M1911, Glocks, SIGs, HKs, Berettas, you name it. You don't have to fumble for that funny position SIG slide stop if you just reach over every time. Or that PPK slide stop! :p

-- Chuck
Ditto! My thoughts exactly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
What Clint Smith said about the Slide release thingy

Well in American handgunner Clint said to pull back the slide to chamber that first round. He said that there is a extra 1/4 of a inch that is put into use instead of just releasing the slidestop......what if your first round is short or something ??? That extra ( SMALL ) amount of slide travel could make the difference. He also stated that not all slide stops are the same and why get use to something that is not the same on every pistol.......a slide is a slide. Now my quote is not exact but I think you get the idea.....I will try and reread my old handgunner issues to see which issue that came out of.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,231 Posts
In a class that I took, Clint Smith said that you should just take a torch and cut the dang button off so that people wouldn't use it to release the slide. He said that pistols will load themselves better than we do so just grab the slide from the side and act like you are trying to rip it off toward your shoulder.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,305 Posts
interesting and good discussion.

i have also used both methods for chambering that 1st round, but like what chuck s had to share on this.

some folks with buffers in (oh no) will find that the sling shot don't sling shot very well, so it's off the buffer or use the slide stop.

some combat focused folks at our range like the thumb on slide release move after they shove in a fresh mag. it is just a natural move for them, untilizes the position of the left hand after the mag change, puts the left hand right back into position quickly, and keeps the gun focused comfortably forward which they prefer. they think it is faster than the sling shot or the cross over move.

as to your question about wear on components....not much difference as already stated. most of our guns are gonna way outlast us unless you are shooting one heck of a lot of rounds.

be safe, shoot well.:rock:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
273 Posts
I was taught to shoot and reload by my dad who was a reserve police officer and also his partner who was one of the PD's range masters. I was only taught to use the slide stop/release after I empty the gun and reload. When I load the gun fresh, I generally slingshot it.

I have also, with my Sig and HK slapping the mag in and it releases the slide also. Anything wrong with that method? Seems to work most of the time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,231 Posts
mitrod3 said:
interesting and good discussion.

some combat focused folks at our range like the thumb on slide release move after they shove in a fresh mag. it is just a natural move for them, untilizes the position of the left hand after the mag change, puts the left hand right back into position quickly, and keeps the gun focused comfortably forward which they prefer. they think it is faster than the sling shot or the cross over move.
Yes it is faster but not as reliable or consistent with other brands of pistols, that's why folks like Thunder Ranch don't teach the use of the release. They don't want you screwing around with a mis-feed in the middle of a gun fight. If it happens in the middle of a game, no big deal.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
687 Posts
Below is from the Army's 1940 Field manual on the 1911A1.

http://www.sightm1911.com/manual/manual.htm

For the purest I am sure there will be much angst.

I have used the slide stop on every pistol I have ever owned, that had one. It is the only way I know of to get the near identical pressures/movement on the slide every time. think Consistency.

Now understand, I came to Jammamatics in the late 80's early 90's, so I am still prejudiced, but none of SIGS and Glocks I own, have owned and shot along the way have ever suffered any damage related to using the slide lock, stop or what ever you wish to call it this week.

My way, and apparently the military's way.

Your way what ever that is, is no doubt much better.

Go figure.


DISMOUNTED

• 28. TO RAISE PISTOL (fig. 6) .--The commands are:

1. raise,

2. PISTOL. At the command PISTOL, unbutton the flap of the holster with the right hand and grasp the stock, back of the hand outward. Draw the pistol from the holster; reverse it, muzzle up, the thumb and last three fingers holding the stock, the forefinger extended outside the trigger guard, the barrel of the pistol to the rear and inclined to the front at an angle of 30 °, the hand as high as, and 6 inches in front of, the point of the right shoulder. This is the position of raise PISTOL.

• 29. To WITHDRAW the- Magazine (fig. 6).--Without lower- Lug the right hand, turn the barrel slightly to the right; press the magazine catch with the right thumb and with the left hand remove the magazine. Place it In the belt or pocket.

• 30. To open the chamber (fig. 6).--Withdraw the maga- zine and resume the position of raise PISTOL. Without lower- ing the right hand, grasp the slide with the thumb and the first two fingers of the left hand (thumb on left side of slide and pointing downward) ; keeping the muzzle elevated, shift the grip of the right hand so that the right thumb engages with the slide stop. Push the slide downward to its full ex- tent and force the slide stop into its notch with the right thumb without lowering the muzzle of the pistol.

• 31. To CLOSE THE CHAMBER.-With the right thumb press down the slide stop and let the slide go forward. Squeeze the trigger.

• 32. To insert a magazine.-without lowering the right hand, turn the barrel to the right. Grasp a magazine with the first two fingers and thumb of the left hand; withdraw it from the belt and Insert it in the pistol. Press It fully home.

• 33. To LOAD PISTOL.--The commands are:

1. LOAD .. PIS- TOL. At the command pistol if a loaded magazine is not already in the pistol, insert one. Without lowering the right hand, turn the barrel slightly to the left. Grasp the slide with the thumb and fingers of the left hand (thumb on right side of slide and pointing upward). Pull the slide downward to its
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,731 Posts
I think that sometimes we baby our guns too much. I myself am guilty of this. They are tools and as such will and should be punished. If they need attention, then we will give it to them. But as long as you stay vigilant most problems don't occur in a vaccum. You will see them starting to show signs of distress or wear. Use your gun often, hard when neccessary, and just give them a little love now and then. We are gun men, not fabroguet egg men.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
7,483 Posts
1940:

The Army's best tank was the M2A4, a tank which predates the M3 (Stuart) light tank.

Horse cavalry was still very much in evidence (OK, horse-portee with trucks to transport the horses from place to place).

The Marine Corps refused to drop the M1903 Rifle (Springfield) for the M1 Rifle (Garand) citing wastage of ammunition among other excuses -- er, reasons.

The pistol was fired with one (1) hand, never two. Use of the slide release makes sense if your other hand is holding the horse's reins.

-- Chuck
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
67 Posts
I was taught to shoot a 1911 by someone that spent many years around them and in the military carrying one (starting in the 1960s). Me using the slide stop as a slide release to chamber a round resulted in him whacking me good on the back of the head. He proclaimed (very loudly and with several colorful words) that I wasn't a movie star, and that you don't use it for that purpose because if it was meant for that, J.B. would have made it larger so you can easily reach it with your thumb without messing with your grip. It didn't take me long to not do that anymore.

I only used the slide stop to easily and gently return the slide forward on an empty chamber (say at the end of a range day). I do it with right thumb, and return slide to battery with my left hand. If I am doing a reload, I sling shot it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Thanks for the responses guys. Only problem for me is that I'm left handed and I have to push the slide stop/release with my trigger finger. A bit tricky but I am used to it. And the part in question is knurled so it is meant to be pressed.

I took a look at that army manual, and it is great! Very thorough. I wish my Kimber had come with a manual like that.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
26 Posts
What's funny about this thread is the fact that I'm having an issue with my guide rod causing the slide to not go back that extra 1/8" in turn not allowing me to chamber a round by just pulling the slide back after its been locked open.

I called Dennis from Kimber about it and these were his words, "THe 1911 is not a modern pistol and was not ment to chamber the first round(with the slide locked back) by pulling the slide back and releasing. It should be done by using the slide stop."

So is Dennis wrong or is he just pulling my string?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,231 Posts
Internal said:
What's funny about this thread is the fact that I'm having an issue with my guide rod causing the slide to not go back that extra 1/8" in turn not allowing me to chamber a round by just pulling the slide back after its been locked open.

I called Dennis from Kimber about it and these were his words, "THe 1911 is not a modern pistol and was not ment to chamber the first round(with the slide locked back) by pulling the slide back and releasing. It should be done by using the slide stop."

So is Dennis wrong or is he just pulling my string?
What model do you have? I have never seen a Kimber that won't allow you to pull back the slide for release unless someone had installed a shock buffer. If it's different from other guns of the same model, then there must be a problem.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,305 Posts
tle:

ditto the shock buffer question/concern as i have had that problem with sling shotting (or not being able to) with one of my Kimber's (Custom II) with a buffer in it.

internal:

let us know what you find out on that.

be safe, shoot well.:rock:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
362 Posts
I sling shot the first round of the first clip.

I release the slide stop with my thumb or index finger in between clips about 50/50. I have no dexterity problem at all in either case, and I purposely shoot just as many rounds from each hand for COM, and shoot just as well from either. I have had no feed problems with releasing the slide stop or sling shotting between clips since I polished everything up after break-in.


Unforgiven
"You only got one arm. Why do you carry two guns?"
"I dont wanna git killed for lack of shooting back."

My version
"Why do you shoot with both hands?"
"If I lose an arm I don't wanna git killed for lack of shootin' back."

As always, YMMV

Caveat emptor.
 
1 - 20 of 66 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top