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Discussion Starter #1
Does anyone here have any knowledge on a pistol called a Whitney Wolverine? The pistol is blued with brown plastic grips and appears to be like new in the box with paperwork. I have never even heard of this before but one came my way and I have the opportunity to purchase it. Is this collectible or have any value as a collectible? Thanks for the help:)
 

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I remember seeing them as a kid and thought they came out of a sci-fi movie. Now I think they actually look terrific - sleek and modern. The originals may have collector value if mint with box - but the modern iteration shouldn't be worth very much.

Good luck.
 

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This is the older model with serial number 247xx, I was told it was made in the 1950's
That's an original. Is it mint with box?
While it may have collector value for someone really wanting one - my guess is that it would be somewhat difficult to find too many buyers -it's a niche market. If your main interest in it is for investment - I don't think you'll get rich off of it - unless you can pick it up for a song.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
It is mint with box and paperwork, a very futuristic looking pistol, it should have been on star trek! Any idea of a fair value?
 

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I had a toy one as a kid. They look fantastic.

Kinda a bummer that it's Mint In Box because you won't want to shoot it. I'd rather have a worn example that I could use.

No idea on value. But I wager it's pretty desirable. You're looking at a perfect example of an offbeat gun, that, nonetheless, many people know of.

So: Fame + Rarity + Flawless Condition usually equate to high value.
 

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I had a toy one as a kid. They look fantastic.

Kinda a bummer that it's Mint In Box because you won't want to shoot it. I'd rather have a worn example that I could use.

No idea on value. But I wager it's pretty desirable. You're looking at a perfect example of an offbeat gun, that, nonetheless, many people know of.

So: Fame + Rarity + Flawless Condition usually equate to high value.
When you pair up a mint Whitney Wolverine with someone itching for it - my guess is $600 to $750. But I think it'll be a cold day in May till you find one. Not sure too many have even heard of it - I mean it's not a Colt or BHP.
 

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I'm guessing north of $1k.

& I'm thinking A LOT of people have heard of it, or remember the shape from Gun Digest & such back in the day.

If it was a total loser, I doubt that it would have been reproduced as it has.

Most orphans just fade away. This one did not.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I must admit, I consider myself a pretty educated gun guy but I have never heard of this one before, it's very intriguing, I just need to make an educated decision on it if I want another safe queen. Thanks for the help:)
 

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I remember the originals. Was sort of amused with them, but there were nicer .22s available. I don't have a clue what the collector's value would be. Probably be pretty simple to find out via Google! ;)
 

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In really nice condition in the box, these are VERY desirable collectors items.
Check to see if the Alcoa Aluminum sticker is still on the bottom of the box.

Last time I actually checked one in 98% original condition started around $600 and it's been a few years since I looked.
I'd imagine that due to everything like this becoming collectible a good one would bring significantly more especially in the box.

Early versions will have the "Wolverine" name on them, newer versions will not.
When the company was told that the Wolverine name was copyrighted by a reloader company, in a gentleman's agreement the Whitney company just stopped using it. Today there'd be lawsuits all over the place.

The gun was made from 1955 to 1962 with only about 13,000 made.
To make a long story short, the only reason it went out of production is because they made the mistake of contracting with J.L. Galef to act as the sold distributor.
He simply wouldn't advertise it and refused to allow Whitney to do so.

Since the outside "frame" is nothing more than a way to hold the working parts together, the outside of the gun could have looked very differently.
Whitney was planning on making special versions with different looks for companies like Sears, Wards, Western Auto, etc.

However, Galef refused to allow them to go forward since he had the exclusive rights to the gun.
Galef wanted to rename the gun as the "Lightning" because of it's extremely fast operation.
With no advertising and no sales as store brands for other companies, manufacture was ended.

These were made in blue, a limited number in nickel.
Usually the blue had brown grips, the nickel with white.
However, Whitney bought the plastic grip material from a plastics company as scraps from their production.
Since they took pretty much what the plastics company was selling them grips in blue, red, and other colors exist.
 

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Something about them being the first pistol using all stamped parts? It's the first handgun I ever shot. ImageUploadedByTapatalkHD1440639766.840216.jpg My dad and my first pistol lesson.

I was 8 in 1957, we were shooting in a quarry. I still have the pistol and single magazine, blue, brown plastic grips. If the thread is still alive when I get home, I take some pics and post them. It was by the day's standard, as others have said: very futuristic looking and for an 8 year old darn fun to shoot.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Something about them being the first pistol using all stamped parts? It's the first handgun I ever shot. View attachment 151201 My dad and my first pistol lesson.

I was 8 in 1957, we were shooting in a quarry. I still have the pistol and single magazine, blue, brown plastic grips. If the thread is still alive when I get home, I take some pics and post them. It was by the day's standard, as others have said: very futuristic looking and for an 8 year old darn fun to shoot.
What a great memory! Awesome picture.
 

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Discussion Starter #17 (Edited)
I was finally able to work out the trade, I still don't know much about these pistols but it feels really good in hand, here are some photos of it.

[

 

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Does it run?
That's an awesome looking pistol, never heard of them before.
 

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Mallard, nice pick up, box and all, well done.

Here is mine - ImageUploadedByTapatalkHD1442850358.134911.jpg ImageUploadedByTapatalkHD1442850386.310243.jpg

Fun little .22, keep it liberally lubed to prevent jamming. Notice the hole in the magazine follower - you can actually insert a .22 there and hold the follower down while loading the magazine - saves your fingers. Happy shooting!
 
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