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Damn, that's why the stores run out. If people would use common sense and just get what they need for a couple of weeks there would be plenty.
Wow. Should we all do that with guns and ammo, too? What about food? Keeping a well stocked pantry makes sense so that in normal times you're not running to the store everyday to get things you need and when things get difficult you're set to weather the storm. And that applies to everything from food staples, to ammo, to paper products.

We're not preppers per se but we have a small farm and our freezers and pantry are full, we have plenty of the stuff we use on a daily basis so that we haven't had to panic buy or worry over this current craziness. And we've suddenly had all kinds of people calling us for eggs, chicks, piglets, and breeder rabbits because folks are feeling the pinch as they realize that they weren't ready for this down turn. Hopefully when this is over those same folks will have learned something and start planning ahead a little so they're better prepared for the next time there's a problem.
 

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A lot of you are saying “No one needs 50 rolls of Toilet Paper”. :confused:



You remind me a lot of our Liberal Friends.



“No one needs an AR-15 or an AK-47.” :eek:

“No one needs a High Capacity Magazine.” :eek:
No correlation at all, no one's trying to take our toilet paper from us. We created that shortage by hoarding. I am as 2A, conservative as anyone but I am buying 2000 rolls of toilet paper.
 

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No correlation at all, no one's trying to take our toilet paper from us. We created that shortage by hoarding. I am as 2A, conservative as anyone but I am buying 2000 rolls of toilet paper.
Meant to say NOT buying.
 

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The question is:

At what point does "prepping" become "hoarding"?

I'd suggest that what one does prior to a shortage is one's own business. Trying to stock up as or after a an event begins is another matter....
Agreed.....I think you are right on target.
 

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Wow. Should we all do that with guns and ammo, too? What about food? Keeping a well stocked pantry makes sense so that in normal times you're not running to the store everyday to get things you need and when things get difficult you're set to weather the storm. And that applies to everything from food staples, to ammo, to paper products.

We're not preppers per se but we have a small farm and our freezers and pantry are full, we have plenty of the stuff we use on a daily basis so that we haven't had to panic buy or worry over this current craziness. And we've suddenly had all kinds of people calling us for eggs, chicks, piglets, and breeder rabbits because folks are feeling the pinch as they realize that they weren't ready for this down turn. Hopefully when this is over those same folks will have learned something and start planning ahead a little so they're better prepared for the next time there's a problem.
They ain't gonna learn squat. When this is over they will all stick their face back in their i phone until the next one. The smart ones will use this as a learning experience and adapt and over come
 

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Wow. Should we all do that with guns and ammo, too? What about food? Keeping a well stocked pantry makes sense so that in normal times you're not running to the store everyday to get things you need and when things get difficult you're set to weather the storm. And that applies to everything from food staples, to ammo, to paper products.
Concur... I typically keep 50#s of rice, 50 of red and black beans, 30ish of pasta on hand... flour, sugar, salt, pepper in lessor, but bulk quantities. Cooking oil, butter, , canned sauces and goods... months worth at any time... The freezer is 3/4 full on a bad day...

2-3 Sams Club packs of TP and paper towels at a given time. Same with soap, toothpaste, deodorant, bleach, vinegar, isopropyl alcohol, etc...

For me, this is the norm. Not out of hording, and only somewhat for "prepping"... mostly of frugality and despising shopping, and wishing to keep it to a minimum...
 

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Since the dawn of time, there's been one weak link in every, single human endeavor...... the human!!!! People, by and large, can be a very disappointing lot. Times like these highlight that fact, from all sides of the equation. You have those who live in their imaginary bubble, going about lost in the fog, and subsequently panic at the slightest provocation because they've been, well, lost in the fog for so long. Then there's the other side: the self-serving, self-righteous, damn-everyone-else, I'm-in-it-for-me types. In the middle are those (few) who take 'caring for each other' seriously, and spare what they can when those truly needy require a hand.

If you're sitting atop your bunker, with its hoard of ammo, food, toilet paper, toothpicks, etc., great, good for you. If you're living day to day, oblivious to what goes on around you, then you may wish to rethink your position. The bottom line is that no one will survive a true, extreme survival scenario (of the 'prep for' type) alone - at least not for very long. You're better off thinking 'bigger picture' and caring a bit more about either your situation or your fellow man - who might just be the one that saves your butt one day down the road.
 

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Since the dawn of time, there's been one weak link in every, single human endeavor...... the human!!!! People, by and large, can be a very disappointing lot. Times like these highlight that fact, from all sides of the equation. You have those who live in their imaginary bubble, going about lost in the fog, and subsequently panic at the slightest provocation because they've been, well, lost in the fog for so long. Then there's the other side: the self-serving, self-righteous, damn-everyone-else, I'm-in-it-for-me types. In the middle are those (few) who take 'caring for each other' seriously, and spare what they can when those truly needy require a hand.

If you're sitting atop your bunker, with its hoard of ammo, food, toilet paper, toothpicks, etc., great, good for you. If you're living day to day, oblivious to what goes on around you, then you may wish to rethink your position. The bottom line is that no one will survive a true, extreme survival scenario (of the 'prep for' type) alone - at least not for very long. You're better off thinking 'bigger picture' and caring a bit more about either your situation or your fellow man - who might just be the one that saves your butt one day down the road.


 

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Since the dawn of time, there's been one weak link in every, single human endeavor...... the human!!!! People, by and large, can be a very disappointing lot. Times like these highlight that fact, from all sides of the equation. You have those who live in their imaginary bubble, going about lost in the fog, and subsequently panic at the slightest provocation because they've been, well, lost in the fog for so long. Then there's the other side: the self-serving, self-righteous, damn-everyone-else, I'm-in-it-for-me types. In the middle are those (few) who take 'caring for each other' seriously, and spare what they can when those truly needy require a hand.

If you're sitting atop your bunker, with its hoard of ammo, food, toilet paper, toothpicks, etc., great, good for you. If you're living day to day, oblivious to what goes on around you, then you may wish to rethink your position. The bottom line is that no one will survive a true, extreme survival scenario (of the 'prep for' type) alone - at least not for very long. You're better off thinking 'bigger picture' and caring a bit more about either your situation or your fellow man - who might just be the one that saves your butt one day down the road.
Very solid post. Never forget the human dynamic. Like it or not, humans are fudementaly pack animals. We require some degree of interaction, either direct or indirect, to survive.
 

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As for the bags of Roman gold found in the ground. Okay, it didn't help him at the last minute but it may have helped him earlier and at least his enemies didn't benefit from it. And the next Roman, whose loot wasn't found, it did help him.

One method used as recently as post WWII was to have gold rolled into rod and sewn into the hem of a garment
 

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Regardless of the "catastrophe", gold and silver have ALWAYS had value, throughout human history. No, they won't help if you're in Pompano at the momentum of the eruption- but neither will food or weapons.

It CAN help you buy what you need, from the forward thinker, who has more than he can use, and can see the eventual return to normalcy.
 

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Regardless of the "catastrophe", gold and silver have ALWAYS had value, throughout human history. No, they won't help if you're in Pompano at the momentum of the eruption- but neither will food or weapons.

It CAN help you buy what you need, from the forward thinker, who has more than he can use, and can see the eventual return to normalcy.
The OP boasted of having "a few hundred lbs" of silver. At current prices, that's about $45K worth of silver. But even today....after the worst market downturn of all time, silver is still off 66% from it's all time high, and down 22% over the past few weeks. I would offer that even under a complete and total collapse of the world's financial and currency system, silver is probably the last thing I'll be accepting in a trade for a can of beans.

You want beans....bring ammo..... LOL!!
 

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Discussion Starter #54
I didn't collect 2 hundred pounds of silver for "The End of The World",
I have it as an investment for my retirement (if I ever do) and most
of the silver I have I bought when it was below $10, and some when
it was below $6. I expect silver to increase greatly in the coming
months due to the 4+ TRIILION DOLLARS being printed, and when it
gets back up to $20+ I'l sell A LOT of it (at a nice profit).

I sold a few thousand dollars worth (on Ebay) a few weeks ago, when
silver was below $11 - and I got $19 an ounce !!

I only have about 3,000 rounds of ammo for my battle rifles and my
pistols - but I do have some nasty 7.62x51 AP/incendiary rounds,
for "The End of The World"....
 

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The OP boasted of having "a few hundred lbs" of silver. At current prices, that's about $45K worth of silver. But even today....after the worst market downturn of all time, silver is still off 66% from it's all time high, and down 22% over the past few weeks. I would offer that even under a complete and total collapse of the world's financial and currency system, silver is probably the last thing I'll be accepting in a trade for a can of beans.

You want beans....bring ammo..... LOL!!
Metals fluctuate, on the whims of the moment... however, when paper currency has no value, hard coin can still buy something from one who has a surplus and faith in a future.
During WWII, the Deutsche mark was hyper inflated- 10,000,000 DM notes were pocket change... a quality ounce of gold coin could feed you for a few weeks- or convince a Nazi officer to turn a blind eye, that you weren't worth his time....

The "value" of gold or silver changes with the situation of the times, not just current "cash" marks value... like every medium of exchange, its predicated on faith in the current, and future, value of that medium- at that time.

Commodities, in the modern world, fluctuate in value on a daily basis.
 

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A lot of people seem to misunderstand the place precious metals (PMs) have in prepping. They are NOT for buying immediate supplies during or immediately after the event. Maybe a tiny bit, but not the overall program.

Initially PMs are for after things settle down and small markets and communities start to form. This where those old junk silver and small increment gold coins start to come into play. They return to what they have always been. Currency with an agreed upon and intrinsic value. A 90% silver quarter is a known quantity of silver and therefore a measurable device for commerce.

If things right up enough that there is still a functional government and there is a national or state currency then the PMs are something you can exchange for that currency at whatever the new exchange rate becomes. Most likely though most people and even some governing bodies will want to trade in metals. Something with intrinsic, measurable value.

The U.S. and most of the world used to be on a gold, then down to silver standard. At one time you could take say dollar bills marked silver certificates in and actually exchange that paper for silver. Each bill was backed by silver. It's when everyone went to fiat currency that it all started going to hell in a handbasket.
 

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I am pretty lucky we ran out of toilet paper about the same time our Sweet Gum Tree Leaves got to the perfect wiping size. Right now we got all the green wipes we need growing on the trees all around my house. If come winter and no more toilet paper then we are gonna be “ship out of luck”.
 

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A lot of people seem to misunderstand the place precious metals (PMs) have in prepping. They are NOT for buying immediate supplies during or immediately after the event. Maybe a tiny bit, but not the overall program.

Initially PMs are for after things settle down and small markets and communities start to form. This where those old junk silver and small increment gold coins start to come into play. They return to what they have always been. Currency with an agreed upon and intrinsic value. A 90% silver quarter is a known quantity of silver and therefore a measurable device for commerce.

If things right up enough that there is still a functional government and there is a national or state currency then the PMs are something you can exchange for that currency at whatever the new exchange rate becomes. Most likely though most people and even some governing bodies will want to trade in metals. Something with intrinsic, measurable value.

The U.S. and most of the world used to be on a gold, then down to silver standard. At one time you could take say dollar bills marked silver certificates in and actually exchange that paper for silver. Each bill was backed by silver. It's when everyone went to fiat currency that it all started going to hell in a handbasket.
True. For one example, at the end of the Civil War, those who still had Gold or Silver had money to pay their taxes and thus keep their homes. Those who'd converted everything to Confederate Dollars were left penniless and lost their properties to the Carpet Baggers.

The "Cash" I have on hand is enough to buy needed items during a temporary suspension of "Normal". This works after things like Hurricanes when stations have power to pump fuel, but the electronics systems are still wrecked and credit cards are useless. And that cash isn't in $100 bills but is instead in $1's, $5's, $10's and "$20's.

The "Bullion" I have is as Amos put it. It's for "After". It's also not the heaviest portion of assets put back.

But I'll tell y'all what folks..... My 5 B's: Beans, Bullets, Bullion, Booze and Butt Wipe have all come in handy and will continue to be assets for one thing or another.

Kinda like the Plumber I called out to fix a root problem in a sewer line.
He did it "After Hours", and commented that the local Liquor Store was out of his favorite Bourbon and that the shelves were pretty thin.

I commented that I had some set back as an "Emergency Supply" and we wound up with me trading him a half gallon jug of Bourbon for the Cleanout which didn't take him long as we have outside access points.

He was happy and I was happy as we both thought it was a good trade.

Not bad for a Sunday Cleanout.

And I'd bet his Sunday evening is a lot more "Laid Back & Mellow". ;-)
 

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Metals fluctuate, on the whims of the moment... however, when paper currency has no value, hard coin can still buy something from one who has a surplus and faith in a future.
During WWII, the Deutsche mark was hyper inflated- 10,000,000 DM notes were pocket change... a quality ounce of gold coin could feed you for a few weeks- or convince a Nazi officer to turn a blind eye, that you weren't worth his time....

The "value" of gold or silver changes with the situation of the times, not just current "cash" marks value... like every medium of exchange, its predicated on faith in the current, and future, value of that medium- at that time.

Commodities, in the modern world, fluctuate in value on a daily basis.

Good points that should be kept in mind.
 

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My wife and I keep some of both Gold and silver stashed away.

I told her the other day that if things really get tight. Anyone that wants ammo or something else. That is how they will need to pay for it. Or something else that I can use.
 
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