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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I got some new .308 brass, made by Prvi. From about a quarter inch
below the shoulder to the top of the neck it has been annealed.
I know annealing restores malleability to work-hardened brass, but
why the heck would you anneal new brass?

I didn't pay much attention when I got the brass, but then I saw the
assaulters on Tactical Arms shooting a Prairie Gun Works Timberwolf
in .338 Lapua. The closeups of the cartridges showed they too had been
annealed. See pic below from MidwayUSA.

Is this marketing or science? I'm guessing marketing. I'm afraid all
will jump on the bandwagon, and in the future, all brass will be pre-
annealed.

Joe

 

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Maybe it is the composition of their brass. I reload a lot of their 556 brass. It is not annealed. so I don't know why on the 308.
 

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All brass is annealed during production. Much of the commercial stuff is polished post annealing to make it shiny and look better. The more "milspec" brass isnt polished to reduce cost.

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Maybe it is the composition of their brass. I reload a lot of their 556 brass. It is not annealed. so I don't know why on the 308.
The Prvi brass? Is it good quality? The salesman told me it is, and
pointed to the annealing as a sign of it. I figured he was BSing me.

Joe
 

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Like BLR stated, ALL brass is annealed. If it wasn't annealed (and softened somewhat) there might not be sufficient neck tension to hold the bullet in place. After you shoot, resize, and seat bullets a few times it is highly recommended to re-anneal the neck of all rifle brass for just this reason.

Commercial brass is generally always polished to remove the signs of annealing, just as we polish our brass to make it "nice and shiny." This is not a marketing thing, and just goes to show how much BS you encounter at gun shops from the average counter guy. Neither is it a sign of "good" brass or "bad" brass, it's evidence of properly manufactured brass.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
So they have skipped an end processing step. And salesman tells
me it makes it 'better.' :biglaugh:

Hmmm . . . you might just be the metal guy, too. Thanks for info.

Joe
 

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Like BLR stated, ALL brass is annealed. If it wasn't annealed (and softened somewhat) there might not be sufficient neck tension to hold the bullet in place. After you shoot, resize, and seat bullets a few times it is highly recommended to re-anneal the neck of all rifle brass for just this reason.

Commercial brass is generally always polished to remove the signs of annealing, just as we polish our brass to make it "nice and shiny." This is not a marketing thing, and just goes to show how much BS you encounter at gun shops from the average counter guy. Neither is it a sign of "good" brass or "bad" brass, it's evidence of properly manufactured brass.
Polishing brass after forming is necessary because the brass is work hardened and would likely split by just seating a bullet. It is annealed so te new case won't split. Normal resizing during reloading is a matter of a few thousandths of an inch, case forming is a lot of work, the case was straight walled.

Not polishing the case saves money, it costs money to polish the brass to a high shine. Military brass is not polished for two pronary reasons, to save money and to show it was annealed.
 

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I got some new .308 brass, made by Prvi. From about a quarter inch
below the shoulder to the top of the neck it has been annealed.
I know annealing restores malleability to work-hardened brass, but
why the heck would you anneal new brass?

I didn't pay much attention when I got the brass, but then I saw the
assaulters on Tactical Arms shooting a Prairie Gun Works Timberwolf
in .338 Lapua. The closeups of the cartridges showed they too had been
annealed. See pic below from MidwayUSA.

Is this marketing or science? I'm guessing marketing. I'm afraid all
will jump on the bandwagon, and in the future, all brass will be pre-
annealed.

Joe

Why anneal new brass?

There are many reasons for this.
From original manufacture to end user Handloader

During factory manufacture they want the intended case to be “compliant” and cooperate with the mass-produced manufacturing process.
Annealing the cases makes them accept the loading process much more reliably
The cases will retain the loaded bullet in the cases much more reliably than in an unannealed case.

Annealing also is important in proper function of the cartridge case during firing in the chamber.
Annealing is performed on most bottleneck and some straight wall rifle cases operating at moderate to high chamber pressure so they perform correctly when fired.
Headspace dimension comes into play here
If you were to fire an unannealed full length resized or factory case (say in your .308)
Instead of the brass flowing or “flexing” at the neck and shoulder on ignition to expand properly in the chamber.
The case may just crack at the shoulder or neck allowing the pressure to escape into the chamber.
This can not only flame cut your chamber (i.e. ruining it) or may blow up the rifle.

The additional benefit to us Handloaders is longer case cycle life, annealing provides this malleable condition to the brass for repeated sizing and firing of the cartridge case.
 

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annealing

Intresting info, how often should you re anneal rifle cases? and what procedure do you use. Wondered about this but could'nt find much info
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Intresting info, how often should you re anneal rifle cases? and what procedure do you use. Wondered about this but could'nt find much info
Standard home method of annealing is to stand up cases in a pie pan,
with enough water in the pan to cover the case heads. For rifle cases,
examples I've seen, you would want the water up to about a quarter
inch short of the shoulder. Using a propane torch heat up the brass,
one case at a time. Once a case is heated, topple it over in the water
to quench it.

Now, we have discussed annealing before. Basically, it makes sense for
exotic or difficult to obtain brass. For ordinary calibers, it's not worth the
effort. If your brass needs annnealing, throw it away and get more.

Joe
 

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Lapua Brass is considered by many (me included) to be the best of the best. It is annealed and looks like this.



Don't sweat it, IMO if the necks on your new brass have the tell tail signs of annealing, it's a sign of quality.
 
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