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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Anyone have experience with this WW2 Limited Edition?

It appears to be a faithful USGI reproduction.

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Watch your top-knot.
 

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Use the search function and type in words like "Colt WW2 reproduction". You'll find a lot of old posts regarding it.

So far the general concensus is that it is well-made and a fairly decent replica of a GI Colt, but that it is also a bit expensive considering that 1,000 clams will almost buy you a real one in decent shape.

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D. Kamm
USGI M1911/M1911A1 Pistols Website
http://www.geocities.com/M1911_M1911A1

[This message has been edited by dsk (edited 10-13-2001).]
 

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It is not a faithful repro. Many of the parts are Series 80 capable, namely the firing pin, FP stop, and extractor. Great gun, just not quite the "real" thing. The parkerized finish is AWESOME. Mine is a shooter. I'll take it to my grave.

In other words..... From my cold, dead hands.

Callahan
 
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Originally posted by BluRidgDav:
Anyone have experience with this WW2 Limited Edition?
Yes. I love it. It is very accurate. Eats hollowpoints as well as hardball. Just as all arms makers make subtle changes to their products over time, the M1911/M1911A1 went through many subtle changes here and there. DSK is much more knowledgable on this subject than I, but this current repro is not exactly like any 1911A1 at any given time in its history. He did post quite a lengthy summary of all the differences. To the military or history buff like myself, this pistol is king of the hill.

Also, in a similarity to auto makers putting out sports cars that are CAFE (Corporate Average Fuel Economy) exempt, the production run has to be small in order to get the exemption. In similar fashion, this pistol has the pre-70 series firing system, which in now way would appear in a full, regular, open-ended production run due to liability. By labelling it a "limited-edition historical reproduction", they get a free pass on the firing system.

Like Inspector Callahan, I will not part with mine. I made the mistake of selling a stainless MKIV Series 80 Government model that I regret to this day.

If it turns you on, buy one. Don't put too much thought into the whole investment portfolio scheme, because I doubt this will greatly appreciate any time soon. Maybe your great grandkids can take it to the Antiques Roadshow and get a decent figure for its curio aspect, but that's about it. And in that case, it will have to remain unfired and retain all the original boxes and paperwork. Do you really want to drop $900 on a safe queen your grandkids might cash in on?

Shoot that rascal and enjoy it.

Take care,
Rob
 

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Rob, you are correct that it was pretty much impossible for Colt to make the repro exactly like the WW2 guns. To make this repro Colt had to take a giant step backward, undoing most (if not all) of the subtle changes that have taken place to the "Model O" line over the last few decades. The machinery and dies used to make the WW2 guns wore out and got replaced ages ago. A detailed study of the WW2 M1911A1 reveals that many changes were made in the time since the first 1911s rolled out of the factory before WW1. Don't let my minor griping overlook the fact that Colt has at last realized that, to move ahead with the future they needed to revisit their past and re-establish the path that they are headed.

I just hope that Colt decides to take this one step further and recreate the WW1-era 1911. For that I might actually be tempted to spend the thousand bucks.

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D. Kamm
USGI M1911/M1911A1 Pistols Website
http://www.geocities.com/M1911_M1911A1

[This message has been edited by dsk (edited 10-14-2001).]
 
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