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FWIW, I'm totally fine with any prog-libby who's too afraid to leave home and travel to another state because of that other state's welcoming attitude towards firearms. Stay at home and stew in the progressive mess you've made for yourself. You and your ilk have already made your own progressive-liberal utopia. Stay there and enjoy it to the fullest. Please, don't come to my state with your problems, attitude or politics. We'll do just fine without you.

With regard to the poster who was complaining about being caught in a "speed trap" in a school-zone, don't kid yourself that none of the localities where you're from don't do the same with regard to out-of-state drivers. Anyone who doesn't know that traffic citations are a major source of revenue for small towns all over the country is just traveling with his or her head in the sand. When YOU KNOW "you're not from around here" and yet you still choose to violate traffic laws (especially posted signs and signals) you also KNOW you're the one who'll get pulled over before the locals. You will almost certainly pay the fine rather than go to traffic court - good as money in the bank. Suck it up, buttercup... You drove fast and got caught while knowing that you already had a big target on the back of your car (in the form of an out-of-state plate).
 

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How about North Carolina tags in Philly.

For years I have made the trek twice a year from Virginia to visit my cancer Doc.

In the past couple of years the crime situation in the city of brotherly love has gotten worse on all levels, and statistics reflect the same fact. We moved from Va. to NC.

I talked the doc into doing the consultations remotely. He knew our visits required an overnight hotel stay....out in the streets for dinner at night...in and out of gas stations...etc.

I don't think I was the first one to make that request. He couldn't be clueless as to what was going on. I appreciated his understanding.
 

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Thankfully I have never had to venture much farther north than Kentucky and Virginia. I don't want to go to any state that does not have reciprocity with SC. I tell you what makes no sense, I had to get an Arizona permit so I could carry in Georgia. It was the only state I went to without reciprocity until they changed the law a few years ago and I can use my SC cwp there. I still keep the Arizona permit updated anyway.

People have a lot of misconceptions about the South. There are good and bad people from all directions of the compass, but I know the South is more friendly and a whole lot less racist than people have been led to believe. The people I have met and talked to that moved here from Detroit, Boston, and a couple of other places seem to be happy they moved. I hope the people that do move south don't bring any leftist northern ways with them.
 

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My bride is a native of New Haven, CN, I'm 6th gen Texian. Our personalities are very different.

My theory: All people need space.

Texans (and is this particularly true of those who live outside of the biggest cities) are friendly because they have SPACE between themselves and their closest neighbors. Friendliest Texans are in West Texas where, for many folks, the nearest neighbors might be 1/4 mile, or even many miles apart. When two West Texans meet, they are very friendly to each other - with all that space, they're glad to see any other human being.

This is true in many other states as well. I'm only singling out Texas because the OP did.

My observation is that urban New Yorkers (and Connecticut, Massachusetts and similar states), by contrast, tend to be very abrupt and impatient (some might describe such behavior as bordering on rude). Why? Because they live, like ants in an ant nest, crawling all over each other. So, they create their "space" with their personalities.

I believe this "space" issue is universal. City dwellers create space with their personalities - essentially a verbal push. Rural folks welcome the chance to visit with others. This is true also in Texas' largest cities: Dallas, Houston, Austin. Not so true in San Antonio, at least yet, but trending that way. "Smaller" Texas cities (Fort Worth, Abilene, Amarillo, etc.) are still very friendly. The trend among Texans, and particularly those at or approaching retirement age, is to move out of the cities and back to small towns (of 25,000 people or fewer) - to be around friendlier people.
 

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There are some really confused, disturbed and ignorant people out there. I would feel much safer in any state that has a pro 2nd Amendment attitude than I would in any anti-gun, anti-self-defense states.
I love road trips but my car has California plates. 1978 I came back from overseas and I drove to my next duty station. Camp Lejeune, NC. I stopped in Iowa to get gas and the old man working there thought I was a "hippy" even with a flat top haircut. He was just blind from ignorance.

Since 1990 or so, whenever I went hunting in WA, ID, UT or CO, people think you are coming here to buy acreage and drive up the property prices.

 

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My bride is a native of New Haven, CN, I'm 6th gen Texian. Our personalities are very different.

My theory: All people need space.

Texans (and is this particularly true of those who live outside of the biggest cities) are friendly because they have SPACE between themselves and their closest neighbors. Friendliest Texans are in West Texas where, for many folks, the nearest neighbors might be 1/4 mile, or even many miles apart. When two West Texans meet, they are very friendly to each other - with all that space, they're glad to see any other human being.

This is true in many other states as well. I'm only singling out Texas because the OP did.

My observation is that urban New Yorkers (and Connecticut, Massachusetts and similar states), by contrast, tend to be very abrupt and impatient (some might describe such behavior as bordering on rude). Why? Because they live, like ants in an ant nest, crawling all over each other. So, they create their "space" with their personalities.

I believe this "space" issue is universal. City dwellers create space with their personalities - essentially a verbal push. Rural folks welcome the chance to visit with others. This is true also in Texas' largest cities: Dallas, Houston, Austin. Not so true in San Antonio, at least yet, but trending that way. "Smaller" Texas cities (Fort Worth, Abilene, Amarillo, etc.) are still very friendly. The trend among Texans, and particularly those at or approaching retirement age, is to move out of the cities and back to small towns (of 25,000 people or fewer) - to be around friendlier people.


I agree with your premise, that folks in sparsely populated areas are just nicer in general than city dwellers. I think the nicest folks I've ever met were in western South Dakota, which is VERY sparsely populated west of the Missouri River. I love it out that way, however, it's hard to get away from a conversation, they're so starved for human contact, they don't really want to stop visiting.
 

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How about North Carolina tags in Philly.

For years I have made the trek twice a year from Virginia to visit my cancer Doc.

In the past couple of years the crime situation in the city of brotherly love has gotten worse on all levels, and statistics reflect the same fact. We moved from Va. to NC.

I talked the doc into doing the consultations remotely. He knew our visits required an overnight hotel stay....out in the streets for dinner at night...in and out of gas stations...etc.

I don't think I was the first one to make that request. He couldn't be clueless as to what was going on. I appreciated his understanding.
I live 90 miles from St. Paul/Minneapolis in Wisconsin. My VA clinic that I had to visit quarterly is in Minneapolis.
When Saint George Floyd expired due to a fentanyl O.D. coincidently while being apprehended for counterfeiting, the twin cities were no place I wanted to be. It was on fire literally.
Thanks to Donald J. Trump the V.A. has a "Community Care" option and now I can drive five minutes to one of the best clinics in the area.
BTW my Concealed Carry rights stop at the Minnesota border thanks to no reciprocity across the big Mississippi.
 

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I love road trips but my car has California plates. 1978 I came back from overseas and I drove to my next duty station. Camp Lejeune, NC. I stopped in Iowa to get gas and the old man working there thought I was a "hippy" even with a flat top haircut. He was just blind from ignorance.

Since 1990 or so, whenever I went hunting in WA, ID, UT or CO, people think you are coming here to buy acreage and drive up the property prices.

Wow.
You look like you were an old guy even back then.

;)
 

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Never had any issues in Texas… but I-35 is that the Indianapolis 500 or what?
I hear ya. Try I-10 through Texas some day. What a s show.
You ought to see the 130 tollway- speed limits to 85 and people generally set the cruise control between 90-95.

Locals refer to 130 as the autobahn! :ROFLMAO:
 
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As I say, "I've seen most of the east coast through the windshield of a car.' For over twenty years I worked for two companies ...one I had 72 accounts in four states and in the other I had 40 accounts in five states. Plus, I had many special assignments in many other states. I've driven from Detroit to Atlanta, most every inch of WVa, Ohio, Maryland, Kentucky, Tenn, Virginia, Georgia and the Carolinas. I've driven to and through Nashville, Knoxville, Louisville, Lexington, Cincinnati, Columbus, Washington, DC, Scranton, Pittsburg, and a list of others that would take hours.

I averaged over 50,000 miles a year, one year I did 72,000 ... our company cars were leased and had to be rotated every 60K ... I got a new one every year. And in all these miles and all these states and cities the only issue I ever had was the terrible traffic in some places. I never had any problems with any of the people. Our company cars had either Ohio or WVa tags depending on the home office of the employer.

I am really glad I'm done with all that ... too many miles, too many motels and too much fast food. Now I do about 3800 miles per year and haven't left the state in over 10 years.
 
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