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What's a NY reload, going for your other gun?

I guess we don't have CA reloads becuase out here in Hollywood, we don't run out of ammo! (except at the final bad guy where there's hand-to-hand stuff)
 

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Skunkability, you need at least two guns for a NY reload. It is believed that the phrase was coined after the raal life experiences of a NYC police officer. This man is alive and well today, he is retired from police work but is still very active in LE tactical training. Out of respect for him I choose not to mention his name here. I will say however that he was know to carry more than two guns and rumor has it that on occasion he used them all.

Lew
 

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Originally posted by Skunkabilly:
What's a NY reload, going for your other gun?

I guess we don't have CA reloads becuase out here in Hollywood, we don't run out of ammo! (except at the final bad guy where there's hand-to-hand stuff)
Correction: I guess you dont have CA reloads, because you're barely allowed guns for the ammo in the first place.


Sympathy, but my position is worse.


[This message has been edited by simion_levi (edited 08-27-2001).]
 

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Simion,

Would it be safe to assume that a fair number of the "illegal" guns in England are in the hands of citizens who don't subscribe to the confiscation theory or has registration over the years been such as to make that extremely difficult?
 

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Jim Cirillo is the guys name. He would want his name mentioned. His book-- Guns, Bullets, and Gunfights is an interesting read. I have heard him lecture and talked to him some years ago at an ASLET conference. GLV
 

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GLV, right you are Jim Cirillo is the man and I have a huge amount of respect for him. Jim is a personal and business friend of mine and perhaps you are right that it is ok to mention him here. He is known as our modern day Maverick having been in more gunfights than any officer in recent history (some people say more than any in all of US history), In any case he has been there, done that, and survived alot. He has deep insight into what really happens in a gunfight.

Lewis Danielson
Crimson Trace Corp
 

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Are you guys sure about that term? Here, every time I go to the buffet table for my second helping, my squad says"Lookout, New York reload!" Sorry couldnt resist..I am originally from NY. I do subscribe to the NY reload thing(as far as carrying a second gun) though if I run out of ammo for my primary and have to go to my back-up..it will be "NY run for the rifle" time. take care all!

------------------
The only thing neccessary for evil to triumph is for good men to do nothing.
 

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Originally posted by Car Knocker:
Simion,

Would it be safe to assume that a fair number of the "illegal" guns in England are in the hands of citizens who don't subscribe to the confiscation theory or has registration over the years been such as to make that extremely difficult?
Of course i can't claim to know the true situation, but my feeling is that very few handguns in England this day are still held by private citizens; the inherent risk of retaining your weapon is ridiculous. It can never be used again - it's not like we can sneak down the range when no-one's looking to get in some practice. Of course we'll still have the odd guy hanging on to his piece, stuck up in a box in the loft, but apart from that handguns are all in the hands of authorities and criminals. Thats pretty much it. No one in their right mind ever 'subscribed to the confiscation theory', but the criminalisation of possession meant all law abiding citizens had little choice but to comply. It's a long prison sentence for gun possession.
 

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greg1911. Talked with Clyde today, he is a good friend of Jim Cirillo. Back in the early 70's there was a rash of robberies taking place in NYC. Banks, Jewlery stores, Phamrmacies, etc. The robbers were taking the goods then killing the people that they had just robbed, this was a big problem for NYPD. They assigned stake out teams consisting of trainers only, by watching the patterns of the bad guys they were able to predict where they would hit next. Jim was one of the first officers assigned to stake outs. It is my understanding that virtually every encounter involved a gunfight. I have heard that on his first encounter there were three bad guys vs Jim...Jim was the only one to walk away. There were many more. Jim if you read this I hope I got it right.

Lew

[This message has been edited by laser (edited 08-31-2001).]

[This message has been edited by laser (edited 08-31-2001).]
 

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Stake out teams/Shotgun squads

One of the earlier and more successful uses of proactive law enforcement. Usually the bad guys wouldnt know they were in trouble until the first shots rang out (usually from concealment). Which is just as it should be!, After the first shots though, if the bad guys arent down, then things start getting really interesting.
Too bad that this practice today (while still completely in keeping with our Penal Code ) would subject us to all kinds of adverse media attention.
When we had a string of robberies here of the local stop and robs, I suggested just this apporach, the high brass reply was "what no warning???" i replied, "uh, if there is more than one of them , then the warning is when the first one falls sir" , they then asked " can we do that??!" to which i had to go back to " yes sir, we can , if you carefully read chapter 9 of the penal code, you find find no duty to retreat or to give warnings sir" , the final word from the brass was " the media will skin us"
The stop and robs stopped shortly after we raided a couple of our local user/dealers homes, seems that they were using more than their business would support and had to supplement the income :rolleyes: .

My hats off to Jim for doing the job right and for his agency having the guts to make it happen.
 

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"Now, always Jim carried three guns during stakeout assignments as he found that during a gun battle one did not have the luxury to stop and reload, despite the movie heroes doing so, as it was easier and more life perpetuating to discard one empty weapon and grab another fully loaded one and discard that one when empty and grab the third loaded weapon. This technique resulted in Mas Ayoob, a famous firearm instructor, naming Jim's multiple weapon technique "The New York Reload," and giving Jim credit for its invention."

From:

http://www.italiausa.com/ialum5.htm
 

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Cirillo's Book

Jim Cirillo is the guys name. He would want his name mentioned. His book-- Guns, Bullets, and Gunfights is an interesting read.
Now, there's and understatement! Sort of wandering off topic, I know, but this book should be mandatory for cops everywhere. It has the whole history of the Stake Out Unit mentioned above, along with his thoughts on guns and bullets, police firearms skills, and the dynamics of gunfights...and some stories that are a hoot, too.
There can't be many like him around, and boy do we need 'em.
 

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I found myself standing next to Mr. Cirillo at the NRA convention

I took my 10-year old son to Pittsburgh and practically bumped into Mr. Cirillo at a reloading display. Knowing a bit about his history I quietly pointed him out to my son and told him he was one of the most decorated NYC policemen in history, and in addition to being a real, live, old-fashioned hero* he's also one of the winningest police competitive shooters in history, to boot. All Kevin could say was, "Wow!" as he stared at him wide eyed.

I didn't say anything because he was there to enjoy the convention and I suspect famous folks like him must get tired of people saying, "I'd really like to shake your hand!" Especially at something like the NRA convention, he'd never get through the exhibit hall. But we both felt like we were in the presence of a hero.

JPC

* Definition of real, live, old-fashioned hero: A public servant, either because they're in a public servant job or they're just an ordinary citizen who steps up and puts themselves in harm's way, to protect or rescue others. They often do this repeatedly, even though they themselves are in mortal danger, and they also have wives (or husbands!) and children of their own who would grieve mightily at their passing. But they do it anyway. People like Jim Cirillo, a true American hero.

Not to be confused with a modern-day hero: Someone who accidentally or serendipitously finds themselves in mortal danger, not necessarily in the act of protecting or rescuing anyone else, and who is intelligent enough to duck and later be interviewed by a journalist.
 
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