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I hope this forum is okay for this topic, when I read the holster forum every topic was about new holsters. I have a WWI hip holster and a WWII sholder holster, both in great shape for thier age. How can I ensure they last alot longer??? Leather products or oil etc... Thanks for any help, Joe
 

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Pecard's Antique Leather Dressing is the best I have found. The old leather loses the oil put back in it after the tanning process, and becomes dry and brittle. An extremely thin coat of Pecard's once or twice a year will keep it in good shape. Don't put the leather out in the sun, as the extra heat breaks down the oils in the Pecards; just let it work at room temperature. It can be buffed with a soft cloth when the Pecard's has soaked in.
 

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Have never tried the Fiebings, but pretty well went through everything else. Some of the leather I treated with Mink Oil 25 years ago still gets a white coating on it. It rubs off, but wouldn't recommend Mink Oil for this reason. Tried the Connaly Hide Food, and one day opened the jar and it smelled like the cow had died in the jar. Neets Foot oil is a no-no as it breaks down the fibers in the leather, plus it turns the leather almost black. Lexol is mostly water, and water is the last thing you want to put on very dry leather. In 25 years haven't found a down side to Pecards.
 

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Hello all,
I just wanted to post an opinion of Pecards by someone considered an expert in mantaining antique holsters. I hope it's ok to do so and please take it in the spirit that it is intended. I know that there are many experiences and self-proclaimed experts out there on many areas. This gentleman is however one of the foremost, especially in th area of military leather. That being said, on to his quote.

GOD, If I hear of Pecard's one more time I am going to puke. This stuff is evil. I just got in a holster that was covered in this gooey waxy, sticky, slime. It took me four hours to clean it off, cooking it in the sun so it would pool and wiping it off. It will never come off completely. If you want to completely ruin a collectable holster either use Pecard's or
Neatsfoot oil.
Pecard's is developed for use on boots in icy slush. Or leather items in harsh rainy weather to repell water. I called Pecard's as did David Mclain and talked to them at length about their product. They DO NOT recommend it for antique leather! Pecard's denies EVER saying it's product was recommended by the Smithsonian for vintage leather as stated on some dealers web sites. This is an urban myth, like the black widow. Pure stupidity.
Any dealer who sells this waste product for use on vintage holsters is culpable of antique leather genocide.
It's my opinion I would never knowingly buy a holster that has had Pecard's applied to it. How could you not know it.
Tom is quite correct, Connoly's hide food is the best and I usually only use it on new made leather parts. It's better to use nothing on vintage holsters. Instead control the storage environment.

"I can not see any reason to not adequately protect the leather. They will certaintly last longer. What is the difference between these and old saddles or any other old leather?"

Protect it from what? You should be protecting it from people who would slap goo all over them.

What's the difference? The difference is, saddles, bridles and other horse gear is subjected to harsh wet weather and dirt. It is meant to be used abused and eventually wear out. Which it does. In the meantime it would be prudent to put Pecard's on it to repell water. This is OK on working leather that you will clean and maintain and will eventually wear out and be disposed of. Granted it might take a hundred years to do so.

Vintage collectable holsters are an entirely different case in point. One is ostensibly trying to preserve them forever. They need repell no water. They do not need treatment to repell water, This goo only soaks into the leather causing the leather fibers that are held together to slip and slide, losing their natural tension, hence the leather becomes mushy. This is really bad on a hardshell Luger holster.
I implore all the members to throw out this stuff.
 

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I was in the same boat with a dry ww1 holster that otherwise was complete and in great shape. Used the Pecard's Antique Leather Dressing as was recommended by many sources and have no regrets. The leather is not mushy at all and feels great. If you are only treating a few holsters, you don't need that much. I think I bought the 16 oz and maybe have used 1/2- 1 oz max.

Steve
 

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Johnny Peppers said:
Some of the leather I treated with Mink Oil 25 years ago still gets a white coating on it. It rubs off, but wouldn't recommend Mink Oil for this reason.
I have an old WWII-era German hardshell holster that has in the past developed a white powder-like residue on the surface of the leather. This residue wiped off very easily, but I was afraid it might be some sort of mold and was wondering what caused it. I guess the holster has been treated with mink oil in the past.
 

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If the leather has truly dried out it may never recover. The leather chin strap on my M1917 Trench Helmet literally fell apart. Locak leather shop made a copy of it for me. I experimented with the left over parts. Treating it with several different "leather finishes" never restored any part of it, just made the parts spongy.

-- Chuck
 

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A friend bought a rare 1900 Luger with a 7" barrel complete with the detachable shoulder stock and holster which is attached to the stock. The holster was extremely dry and the smooth top layer of the leather was 50% gone. He kept the holster/shoulder stock wrapped in a towel, and each time he unwrapped it more leather had come off on the towel. Several coats of the Pecard Antique Leather Dressing stopped the loss of leather and has stabilized the holster.
The sad thing about old leather articles is that they are continually in a state of decay, and someday will not exist. We can only preserve it as best we can.
 

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"Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnny Peppers
Some of the leather I treated with Mink Oil 25 years ago still gets a white coating on it. It rubs off, but wouldn't recommend Mink Oil for this reason.


I have an old WWII-era German hardshell holster that has in the past developed a white powder-like residue on the surface of the leather. This residue wiped off very easily, but I was afraid it might be some sort of mold and was wondering what caused it. I guess the holster has been treated with mink oil in the past."

Its called 'bloom', and its harmless. Pretty common with most leather treatments. Just brush it off. Mold/mildew looks dusty gray.
 

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1saxman said:
Its called 'bloom', and its harmless. Pretty common with most leather treatments. Just brush it off. Mold/mildew looks dusty gray.

Thank you for the info!
 
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