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I have been using a flannel rag and some Break-Free CLP to wipe the finger prints off of my new Colt 1991A1 after I'm done handling/fondling it. A buddy here on the site recommended using a silicon rag instead, which I'm switching to.

But last week a local collector and FFL guy I talk to used a cotton rag with WD-40 on it to wipe the fingerprints off of his blued Remington-Rand 1911A1. I had always thought that WD-40 was a bad choice because I had been told that it contained water in the mixture (a corrosion worry).

But, the FFL told me WD-40 had never corroded anything of his, and that it was (is) a penetrant which made it a good choice (in case, say, pirspiration gets in under the grips after a day at the range). He also told me that silicon will build up over time, as will my gun oil (CLP). I had figured maybe laying off of the gun oil was in order just to keep dust off (and out).

So now he has me thinking about switching to WD-40 on a rag for wipe-down.

What do you think?

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I have always heard that WD-40 is a penetrant that will ruin ammo. For that reason, I have avoided using it anywhere on my guns and reloading press.
 

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NO!!!

FYI= a friend of mine have used WD-40 on his rifle before (which was a long time ago) and he admit he made a very big mistake. he got rust on his rifle and now, have swear off WD-40.

for wipe downs,..i've always used silicone treated cloth.
 

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I have heard that solvents can work their way into primers and disable them. But, I think we're talking about hosing down a cartridge or keeping it "wet" with solvent in order for this to happen. Obviously, if you keep a loaded magazine around for years you don't want it dripping with WD40.
I use WD to hose down my frame and slide after disassembly...loosens the crud and then everything gets wiped down and cleaned before being lubed. I don't use it as an oil or as a finish protector. CLP (or LP) works great on blue finishes and I'm sure silicone cloths also are great.
-Sparks
 

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I occasionally use WD-40 to clean my stainless Springfield but I find that it leaves it looking dull and dried out. So I always rub it down with light machine oil after the WD-40.
 

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My rationale is if there's the slightest chance that WD-40 will cause damage to a gun over an extended period of use, why take the chance? I invest a lot of money into my guns; they deserve proven cleaning supplies. And that's what they get.
 

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WD40 is GREAT!!.......for removing bumper stickers and other dryed up glue junk.

....seriously.
 

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aaahhhh the OLD WD40 topic,

WD40 means "water displacement #40" www.wd40.com

What does WD-40 contain?
While the ingredients in WD-40 are secret, we can tell you what WD-40 does NOT contain. WD-40 does not contain silicone, kerosene, water, wax, graphite, chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), or any known cancer-causing agents.

How long does WD-40 last after application?
While this may vary depending on the application, WD-40 remains effective even after it appears to dry. The corrosion and rust protection ingredients remain adhered to the surface. External conditions may, of course, require additional applications of WD-40 for maximum protection.
http://www.wd40.com/Brands/wd40_faqs.html

Heres my Slimy Worthles Opinion on this stuff -- ive heard all the horror stories from using this stuff, and my personal opinion is that any problems comes from Operator Error. Or from spraying a gun down with the stuff and storing it away for years, then it comes out rusty after the wd40 has worn away. I have also personally soaked 5-6 LC 223 primed blanks in WD40 for up to 20 hours and they all fired, but i should expriment longer and will. I used blanks so in case of a squib i wouldnt have a bullet stuck in the barrel. Now obviously if you spray down your reloading equipment and the wd40 gets into the powder area of the primer than yes it would kill it (which is where i think the wd40 killing primer rumor came from)
Me, personaly ive used the stuff on guns for at least 10 years, and my dad for probably 30 years -- never a complaint, or problems that comes directly from wd40. My brother had his parkerized 870 wiped down with silicone cloth, and stored in a silicone gun sock and it still rusted --Operator Error -- he stored it in a dark damp place.

my personal usage of the stuff goes like this -- i spray down the entire dirty gun with the stuff(penetrate the dirt), use a toothbrush to scrub the dirt, and then an old rag to wipe the dirt and excess wd40 away, the wd40 can act as a rust repellant in the guns nooks and crannys that i cant reach. I use CLP to oil up the moving parts on the gun (springs, rails, worn spots), work the action of the gun to get the excess CLP out and rub it on the outside of the gun for more protection, and then use a silicone cloth to wipe down the entire gun. Pretty simple IMO

Dr Fever, IMO using a WD40 soaked rag to wipe the gun down is OK, a silicone cloth is Better. i think the gun dealer said was right, but the final wipe down would be better with silicone gun cloth for longer storage. He probably used the wd40 rag for immediate and temporary cleaning.

just my opinion, dont kill me YET, im still new
 

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also the WD40 is Supposed to dry into a film(which gives it the dull gummy look that people complain about), creating a protection barrier, you can wipe this way or apply more wd40 to break it up
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Hmmm. Thanks for all of the info. I guess I'll stick to the silicon rag, since everyone seems to agree that that's a safe way to go (not saying WD-40 isn't; just that everyone seems to agree on the silicon).

Thanks again (any additional opinions are still sought genuinely appreciated, however).
 

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I think WD-40 has its uses, but it definately is not the best rust preventative. I have used it to spray down parts when detail stripping extremely dirty guns. It does a pretty good job of loosening carbon or rust. I recently cleaned up a friend's badly rusted nickel 70 seies GM. Slide and frame were put into ziplock bags then hosed down with the stuff and allowed to sit several hours prior to scrubbing with a stiff nylon brush.

That having been said, CLP will do the job just as well and is a superior rust preventative/lubricant.

For the best overall performance as a rust preventative though, Birchwood Casey Sheath wins hands down. I had a rust problem on the grip frame of a stainless J-frame. Sheath took care of the problem after CLP failed to stop the rust from coming back.

Tim
 

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I use it to blast out gunk in those hard to reach places and to loosen moly in my barrel. But I always wipe down with an oiled rag. I've heard that WD40 is slightly abbrasive and can weare aware your finish.

tjg
 

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WD-40 is claimed to remove rust, and since bluing is a form of rust . . .
 

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WD-40 is great stuff when the old Jeeps been sittin' a while & ain't crankin....spray a little in the carb, and Vaarrrroooom!
It also helps get the greasy dirt out from under your nails.
It cleans my kids bicycle chains as good as gasoline..

As to guns...too many "good" products out there to even consider it
JMO,
Stocky.


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wd40.I've used it for 35years.never any problems.keep it away from primers.tom.

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WD40 is good for what it was designed to do, that is penetrate. I've used it on shotgun tubes, etc. for 30+ years but I will not used it on handguns. I'm not sure exactly what is left when the solvents in '40 evaporate and that's something I don't like.

Uses a silicone cloth for a wipedown and CLP for a lube. They work!
 

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I use WD-40 for cleaning, usually with a brass (tooth)brush, in the breachface/extractor area and any other fouled internal area. After I have loosened-up all the crud and carbon build-up, I blast everything out of there with RemAction Cleaner or Bichwood-Casey Gunscrubber. After everything dries-out, I apply Breakfree CLP.
 
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