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No. 1911s don’t have decockers just a basic safety lever. The hammer has to be cocked for a trigger pull to fire the pistol. The only safe way to carry a 1911 with a round in the chamber is cocked and locked. It may look scary and unsafe to those who are unfamiliar with 1911s however remember that the only way it can usually be fired is with the safety off and the grip safety engaged.
I say usually because with the original design series 70 1911s it can apparently go off if dropped and the firing pin is forced forward into the chambered rounds primer. You can buy series 80 1911s that engage a safety plunger that will not allow the firing pin to move forward into a round if dropped but a basic GI model like this will usually be a series 70.
Someone please correct me if I’m wrong about this pistol as I’m sure that I’ve seen a series 80 from Tisas available in the past. I’m just assuming that this Tanker GI is a series 70. Apparently the 70s have a nicer trigger pull. Again please let me know if I’m also wrong about this.
Just to reply to your request for information:

Way back, right before WWII, Colt made 1911 pistols, for the civilian market only, that had a passive firing pin safety. This was designed by a Colt employee with the last name of "Swartz" (Not "Schwartz" as some people mistakenly pronounce it.) wherein the grip safety, when depressed, operated a plunger in the frame which engaged another plunger in the slide which, when at rest, blocked the forward motion of the firing pin. The problem with the Swartz safety was that, depending on the point at which the grip safety disengaged from blocking the trigger, it was possible that the trigger could release the hammer before the Swartz system released the firing pin. Note that a 1911 grip safety normally releases the trigger at somewhere around 50% of it's travel. However, a good feature of the Swartz safety was that, since the safety was disengaged by the grip safety and not the trigger, the trigger pull was in no way adversely affected.

Again, the Swartz safety was only produced on civilian-market guns and were never purchased by the military. A side note is, right after Pearl Harbor and the entry of the U.S. into WWII, the War Department placed a very large emergency order with Colt for 1911-A1 pistols, with delivery on an ASAP basis. Colt at the time had a fair number of civilian 1911 pistols in inventory awaiting shipment to distributors, and offered them to the government in order to fill as much of the order as they could, as fast as they could, out of inventory. The government accepted this offer with three provisions:

1. The "civilian" serial numbers were to be ground off of the pistols and they were to be re-numbered with new serial numbers to meet the government's format.
2. The beautiful polished blued finish had to be removed and the pistols were to be re-finished using the Parkerizing process.
3. The Swartz safety had to be removed. I understand that this was because the army already had a large number of armorers trained on the pistol, but not on the Swartz system.

As regards to Colt, this was the end of the Swartz firing pin safety. When civilian production resumed after the war, no firing pin safety mechanism of any sort was installed.

(The WWII 1911s that were provided from civilian inventory still had the square broached hole in the top rear of the frame and bottom of the slide which was an artifact of the originally-installed Swartz safety. These are a subset of collector pistols nowadays, which are known as "commercial conversions", and are much sought after by collectors.)

Much later, in the 1980s I presume, and due to product liability litigation threats, Colt decided to design and again begin installing a passive firing pin safety on their 1911 pistols. Instead of simply resuming production of the Swartz system, they instead designed a new safety mechanism that was overcome by levers activated by the trigger bar. This prevented the timing problem of the Swartz safety allowing the trigger to be pulled before the firing pin was taken off-safe. It did, however, have a slight effect on trigger pull, but, if one was going to fire repeated shots, it only affected the first trigger pull, as one could just let the trigger reset and then start the pull again. It was only a problem if the shooter completely releases the trigger between shots, so that it is necessary to start the trigger "take-up" all over again.

Pistols without the Series-80 system were still manufactured and offered for sale, but were simply re-designated as Series-70 pistols. The only other difference is that the Series-70 pistols have a half-cock notch on the hammer, while that is omitted on the Series-80 version.

I have two 1911 pistols with the Series-80 system. If I am dry-firing the pistols, and I take special care to feel for it, I can feel the Series-80 levers doing their job during the first little bit of the trigger pull. But if I am at the range my mind is occupied with making a good shot and I don't notice it.

By the way, I believe that Kimber and Smith & Wesson install a slightly updated version of the Swartz system on their 1911s - which would be a good reason NOT to buy either. (Let me pause here and don my asbestos long undies.)
 

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....the Swartz firing pin safety....
Pardon moi, if I say that the Swartz, like the Series 80, is a solution looking for a problem. Some will disagree, and I know why... but its just my opinion.

Since this a Tanker thread, let me say my new Tanker is a really nice pistol. Got mine about two weeks ago, and the single flaw I could find was the safety catch (aka thumb safety for those in Rio Linda) overhung the back of the receiver just a tad, It was easily corrected. And that's it. Great slide/receiver fit. Great barrel fit. Nice trigger. Sights are what they are, but you know that going in. Finish is Ceracoat (my first Ceracoat firearm), and seems durable enough so far. My other "complaint" is the black plastic grips. Big deal, a little safety catch issue, and the preference for something more organic in the grip department. Both corrected, and that pistol is good to go! Something about Commander sized 1911's appeals to me more than all the others.
 

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Just curious...about the "Tanker Garand." I have read it was fully developed and never issued. And I have read it was researched but the program ended as soon as prototypes were fired.

Finally, I have read they never existed within government programs but were dreamed up by an enterprising fellow who rebuilt regular Garands and sold the mini Garands as "Tankers." Anyone know?
FWIW: 'Tanker Garands': The Real Story - Guns in the News
 
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